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The Best Coaching Books, Tapes and Videos

Our Standards for Review
In this section we have provided a list of the highest-rated books and videos on coaching along with reviews of their contents. Unless otherwise noted, all reviews have been written by Rey Carr. Only coaching books, videos or tapes which meet the highest standard of excellence are included in this list. Materials which have received unfavorable reviews, while potentially instructive, have not been included.

Peer Resources Network members can receive a complimentary copy of recently published works in exchange for completing a professional review.

How to Order Resources Listed
Books can be ordered online from our link to Amazon.com, which is a good choice for US or international purchases. Selecting the Amazon.com link will take you directly to that book at Amazon.com.

We have also provided a link to Amazon.ca, which is an excellent choice for Canadian purchases. Selecting the Amazon.ca link will take you directly to that book at Amazon.ca. If no Amazon.ca link is provided, it is likely that the book is not available for purchase from an online source in Canada.

If you like to compare prices and find the best deal, then use our link to BestBookBuys.com, a service that compares prices at 28 online bookstores, including stores that specialize in used books. Books can be ordered directly from the sources listed at Best Book Buys.

In some cases, the book or video can only be ordered directly from the publisher. When available to the public, email addresses for authors are included.

Current Resources Listed
The following table lists in alphabetical order all the books in this section. Selecting "View" will take you to the review and details of that work within the scrollable list. Feel free also to just scoll through the entire list.

Title Author(s) Pub Date
Action Coaching: How to Leverage Individual Performance for Company Success (View) David Dotlich and Peter C. Cairo
1999
Adaptive Coaching: The Art and Practice of a Client-Centered Approach to Performance Improvement (View) Terry R. Bacon and Karen I. Spear
2003
The Adversity Quotient: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities (View) Paul Stoltz
1999
The Art of Building People: 36 Coaching Tools to Get More out of Work and Life (View) Michael Chiodi
2003
Assess and Improve Your Company (View) John Seiffer
2000
Awakening Corporate Soul: Four Paths to Unleash the Power of People at Work (View) Eric Klein and John Izzo
1998
Be Your Own Coach: Your Pathway to Possibility (View) Barbara Braham and Chris Wahl
2000
Be Your Own Executive Coach: Master High Impact Communications (View) Paul Delisser
1999
Becoming a Professional Life Coach: Lessons from the Institute of Life Coach Training (View) Patrick Williams and Diane S. Menendez
2007
Body-Centered Coaching: Using the Body as a Resource for Change (View) Marlena Field
2005
The Business Coach: A Game Plan for the New Work Environment (View) James S. Doyle
1999
The Business of Coaching: A Comprehensive Guide to Starting and Growing Your Own Coaching Practice (View) Dorcas Kelley
2002
The CCL Handbook of Coaching. A Guide for the Leader Coach (View) Sharon Ting and Peter Scisco (Editors)
2006
Chop Wood, Carry Water: A Guide to Finding Spiritual Fulfillment in Everyday Life (View) Rick Fields, Peggy Taylor, Rex Weyler
1985
Coach Anyone About Anything (View) Germaine Porché and Jed Niederer
2001
Coaching a Winning Team (Video) (View) Featuring Tara VenDerveer
1997
Coaching Across Cultures: New Tools for Leveraging National, Corporate and Professional Differences (View) Philippe Rosinski
2002
The Coaching at Work Toolkit: A Complete Guide to Techniques and Practices (View) Perry Zeus and Suzanne Skiffington
2002
Coaching: Evoking Excellence in Others (View) James Flaherty
1998
Coaching and Mentoring for Dummies (View) Marty Brounstein
2000
Coaching and Mentoring: Practical Methods to Improve Learning (View) Eric Parsloe and Monika Wray
2000
Coaching for Committment: Interpersonal Strategies for Obtaining Superior Performance from Individuals and Teams (View) Dennis Kinlaw (2nd Edition)
1999
Coaching for Performance (View) John Whitmore
2002
Coaching for Results: CD ROM (View) McGraw Hill Series
1998
Coaching in the Library: A Managmenet Strategy for Achieving Excellence (View) Ruth F. Metz
2002
Coaching Leaders: Guiding People Who Guide Others (View) Daniel White
2005
Coaching that Counts: Harnessing the Power of Leadership Coaching to Delivery Strategic Value (View) Dianna Anderson and Merrill Anderson
2004
Coaching Soup for the Cartoon Soul (Numbers 1, 2, and 3) (View) Germaine Porche and Jed Niederer
2006
Coaching with Spirit: Allowing Success to Emerge (View) Teri-E Belf
2002
The Coach's Handbook: Exercises for Resolving Conflict in the Workplace (View) Tim Ursiny
1999
Coach Yourself to Success: 101 Tips for Reaching Your Goals at Work and in Life (View) Talane Miedaner
2000
Co-Active Coaching: New Skills for Coaching People Toward Success in Work and Life (View) Laura Whitworth, Henry Kimsey-House and Phil Sandahl
1998
The Complete Guide to Coaching at Work and The Coaching at Work Toolkit: A Complete Guide to Techniques and Practices (View) Perry Zeus and Suzanne Skiffington
2000
The Coward's Guide to Conflict: Empowering Solutions for Those Who Would Rather Run Than Fight (Coaching Conversations for Personal and Business Success) (View) Tim Ursiny
2003
Creating Your Future: Five Steps to the Life of Your Dreams (View) David B. Ellis
1998
Developing High Performance People: The Art of Coaching (View) Oscar G. Mink, Barbara P. Mink, Keith Owen
1993
Discovering New Horizons: Leadership Coaching for the 21st Century Principal (View) Teachers21 and ATLAS Communities
2007
The Do's and Don'ts of Work Team Coaching: A Comprehensive Study of the Worker/Coach Interpersonal Relationship (View) Randy Glasbergen and Steve Herbelin
1998
Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a Time (View) Bob and Megan Tschannen-Moran
2010
Executive coaching: A guide for the HR professional (View) Anna Marie Valerio and Robert J. Lee
2005
Executive Coaching: Practices and Perspectives (View) Catherine Fitzgerald and Jennifer Garvey Berger (Editors)
2002
Executive Coaching with Backbone and Heart: A Systems Approach to Engaging Leaders with Their Challenges (View) Mary-Beth O'Neill
2001
Extreme Success: The Seven Part Program that Shows You How to Succeed Without Struggle (View) Rich Fettke
2002
Falling Awake: Creating the Life of Your Dreams (View) David B. Ellis
2002
First Things First: To Live, to Love, to Learn, to Leave a Legacy (View) Stephen R. Covey, A. Roger Merrill, Rebecca Merrill
1996
Four Steps to Building a Profitable Coaching Practice: A Complete Marketing Resource Guide for Coaches (View) Deborah Brown-Volkman
2003
Getting Started in Personal and Executive Coaching: How to Create a Thriving Coaching Practice (View) Stephen G. Fairley and Chris E. Stout
2003
The God in Coaching(View) Betska K-Burr
2014
The Handbook of Coaching: A Resource Guide to Effective Coaching with Individuals and Organizations (View) Frederic M. Hudson
1999
The Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America (View) David Whyte
1996
The Heart of Coaching: Using Transformational Coaching to Create High-Performance Culture (View) Thomas G. Crane
1998
How to Build Your Ideal Practice in 90 Days (View) David Steele
2002
How to Want What You Have: Discovering the Magic and Grandeur of Ordinary Existence (View) Timothy Ray Miller
1996
I Could Do Anything If I Only Knew What It Was: How to Discover What You Really Want and How to Get It (View) Barbara Sher and Barbara Smith
1995
If It Wasn't for the People This Job Would Be Fun: Coaching for Buy-In and Results (View) C.B. Motsett
1998
Inspirational Leadership: Destiny, Calling and Cause (View) Lance Secretan
1999
Intentional Change: Personal and Professional Coaches Describe Their Work and Lives (View) John S. Stephenson, Editor
1999
Jesus, Life Coach: Learn from the Best (View) Lori Beth Jones
2004
The Law of Attraction: The Science of Attracting More of What You Do Want and Less of What You Don't (View) Michael J. Losier
2003
Leadership Coaching for the Workplace (View) Timothy Bentley and Esther Kohn-Bentley
2002
Leading from the Inside Out: A Coaching Model (View) V.E. Bianco-Mathis, L.K. Nabors, C.H. Roman
2002
Leading High Impact Teams: The Coach Approach to Peak Performance (View) Cynder Niemela and Rachael Lewis
2001
Make Your Life a Masterpiece (View) Peter Legge
2007
Making Your Dreams Come True: Find Your Passion with America's Dream Coach (View) Marcia Wieder
1999
Masterful Coaching: Extraordinary Results by Impacting People and the Way They Think and Work Together (View) Robert Hargrove
1995
Masterful Coaching Fieldbook: Grow Your Business, Multiply Your Profits, Win the Talent War! (View) Robert Hargrove
2000
Measuring Hidden Dimensions: The Art and Science of Fully Engaging Adults (View) Otto E. Laske
2006
Mind Over Water: Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing (View) Craig Lambert
1998
The Mindful Coach: Seven Roles for Helping People Grow (View) Doug Silsbee
2010
New Directions for Therapists: Building a Successful Coaching Practice (Audiotape) (View) Patrick Williams (Interviewer)
2000
The New Private Practice: Therapist-Coaches Share Stories, Strategies and Advice (View) Lynn Grodzki (Editor)
2002
The Nurse Executive's Coaching Manual (View) Kimberly McNally and Liz Cunningham
2014
The Passion Plan: A Step-by-Step Guide to Discovering, Developing, and Living Your Passion (View) Richard Y. Chang
1999
The Path of Least Resistance: Learning to Become the Creative Force in Your Own Life (View) Robert Fritz
1989
Peer Coaching (Various books mostly associated with educational organizations (View) Various
Various
Performance Coaching: The Handbook for Managers, HR Professionals and Coaches (View) Angus McLeod
2003
Personal and Executive Coaching: The Complete Guide for Mental Health Professionals (View) Jeffrey E. Auerbach
2001
Personal Coaching for Results: How to Mentor and Inspire Others to Amazing Growth (View) Lou Tice
1997
Presence-Based Coaching: Cultivating Self-Generative Leaders Through Mind, Body, and Heart (View) Doug Silsbee
2009
The Psychology of Executive Coaching: Theory and Application (View) Bruce Peltier
2001
Quiet Leadership: Six Steps to Transforming Performance at Work (View) David Rock
2006
Seal the Deal: The essential mindsets for growing your professional service business (View) Suzi Pomerantz
2006
Secrets of an Executive Coach: Proven Methods for Helping Leaders Excel Under Pressure (View) Alan Downs
2002
Soar with Your Strengths (View) Donald O. Clifton and Paula Nelson
1996
The Solo Professional: Navigating the Business Side of Your Business (View) Valerie Barone and Karen Childress (Editors)
2002
Soul Work: Finding the Work You Love, Loving the Work You Have (View) Deborah P. Bloch and Lee J. Richmond
1998
Spiritual Audit of Corporate America: A Hard Look at Spirituality, Religion and Values in the Workplace View) Ian Mitroff and Elizabeth Denton
1999
Stop Managing, Start Coaching! How Performance Coaching Can Enhance Commitment and Improve Productivity (View) Jerry W. Gilley and Nathaniel W. Broughton
1996
Take Time for Your Life: A Personal Coach's Seven Step Program for Creating the Life You Want (View) Cheryl Richardson
1998
Take Yourself to the Top: The Secrets of America's No. 1 Career Coach (View) Laura Berman Fortgang
1998
Therapist as Life Coach: Transforming Your Practice (View) Patrick Williams and Deborah C. Davis
2002
To Build the Life You Want, Create the Work You Love: The Spiritual Dimension of Entrepreneuring (View) Marsha Sinetar
1996
Total Life Coaching: 50+ Life Lessons, Skills, and Techniques to Enhance Your Practice...and Your Life (View) Patrick Williams
2004
What Next? The Complete Guide to Taking Control of Your Working Life (View) Barbara Moses
2003
Winning in the Game of Life: Self-Coaching Secrets for Success (View) Tom Gegax
1999
Working Life: The Promise and Betrayal of Modern Work (View) Joanne Ciulla
2000


 
Presence-Based Coaching: Cultivating Self-Generative Leaders Through Mind, Body, and Heart
Doug Silsbee
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]At the outset I have to state that I'm not sure if I can be as objective in writing a review of Doug Silsbee's book, Presence-Based Coaching: Cultivating Self-Generative Leaders Through Mind, Body, and Heart. I've known Doug Silsbee for many years. He's been a dedicated member of and active contributor to my own organization, The Peer Resources Network. I've seen dozens of rave reviews of his coach training retreats; I've known many coaches who highly value what they've learned from him; and my own interactions with him have always been productive and enlightening.

I also read and greatly admired his first book, The Mindful Coach: Seven Roles for Helping People Grow, and have recommended it many times as one of the best guides for learning how to be an effective coach.

The coaching world has grown considerably since I first became acquainted with Doug's work. There are now dozens of coaching associations; more than 650 coach training organizations; and an estimated 80,000 coaches practicing worldwide. To some degree I can tell that he has played a significant role in enlarging that world. From the person who wrote the foreword in his current book to the 20 testimonials that accompany the book, Doug is connected to and has had an influence on a veritable "who's who" in the coaching arena.

While beginning coaches could benefit from this book, it mostly addresses both coaches and leaders who want to deepen their understanding of themselves and fully develop what Doug calls "presence."

The majority of the book is dedicated towards helping readers look inside themselves. Doug teaches the reader to "cultivate and discover" the role of heart, mind, and body "in generating our capacity to learn and develop."

Presence, he believes, "is central to our capacity to be self-generative," and, "in fact, our ability to facilitate lasting, sustainable development in others absolutely rests on the presence that we offer to the relationship."

The foundation for Doug's book, and a statement that can be treated like an axiom in the helping professions, is we must first work on our inner selves before we can hope to deliver "what coaching often promises."

The principles that Doug is referring to that are essential for developing presence have long been the practices that have made a significant difference in my professional, personal and leadership work. Like Doug, I too have seen the impact that presence can have in acting as a catalyst for change.

Doug has taken the knowledge he has gained from working with thousands of clients and leaders, mentoring other coaches, and learning from the participants in his training and has identified and articulated concepts, growth exercises, practical tools, examples, and illustrations from the business world to help others become "grounded in a solid understanding of how we grow and change...."

While this book isn't exactly a how-to treatise, he provides many details about the methodology of presence-based coaching and provides examples of dialogues or conversations to illustrate how accelerated growth takes place using a presence-based approach.

In virtually every one of the 12 chapters in this book, Doug includes practice exercises designed to maximize learning the principles and ideas described with such precision in each chapter.

In some ways this can be a difficult book to get through. It's not the language, the concepts, or the ideas that make it slow going. It's the challenge to the reader to engage in the particular exercise. Doug intends for the book reader to experience presence while he or she is actually reading the book.

The exercises, therefore, can challenge an existing viewpoint or belief system. He provides guidance for dealing with these challenges and recognizes that moving too quickly through an exercise can be "an excellent way to protect what you already know." He suggests that readers take his advice an engage in a "presence pause" in order to entertain "possibility."

There are some additional touches that make the book worthwhile. Throughout the book Doug has included quotes from well-known sources. Each one acts as a succinct and meaningful statement about what the chapter will be about. He provides a summary at the conclusion of each chapter that acts as a review of the key points. And while other books provide a bibliography of references or citations from each chapter, Doug has gone one step further and included an annotated bibliography of that particular reference giving the reader a more thorough understanding of the content of the cited sources.

In summary, Presence-Based Coaching is an excellent book not just for coaches but also for leaders and educators. Its focus on authenticity, reflection, and self-renewal will help anyone in those fields become a master in their work and life. But be sure to write your name and address in your copy because, if you loan it to someone, they probably will want to keep it for a long time. (Review by Rey Carr, Ph.D., CEO, Peer Resources)

Ordering Alternatives:


 
The God in Coaching: The Key to a Happy Life
Betska K-Burr
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]With the rapid advancement of coaching, many new books about coaching have been published with the intention of helping coaches accelerate their coaching practices. But no expert before the publication of Betska K-Burr's book has assembled the variety of deeper levels or empirical, spiritual, psychological and bio-neurological foundations that will definitely enable coaches to transform themselves from being good to being great. This book is one of the first to focus on how the laws of human development, the characteristics of contemporary society, and the evolution of consciousness all impact coaching outcomes.

The wide-ranging topics, all clearly necessary and neatly assembled into an integrated whole, even include a wonderful, and often ignored, section on how the seven stages of eating habits relate to coaching practice. The beginning chapters in this book provide a thorough and easily readable foundation for what is probably the most revolutionary and effective model of coaching to be developed in the last ten years: Betska K-Burr's Power Coaching® with Mind-Kinetics®.

In the later chapters more details are provided to illustrate not only how this model works, but also through the use of coaching session deconstruction why the model works as well. This model, known as "PCMK™", is truly unique, and I'm sure will serve as both a source of inspiration and as a beacon to light the path to coach effectiveness. (Review by Rey Carr Ph.D., CEO, Peer Resources.)

Ordering Alternatives:


 
The Nurse Executive's Coaching Manual
Kimberly McNally and Liz Cunningham
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This book covers the specialization of coaching in the environment of health care. This growing area of opportunity for coaching can have a significant positive impact on employee engagement and satisfaction.

Many threads and levels of knowledge are touched upon including basic psychology related to coaching, human behavior, and those areas often overlooked by nurses who can unwittingly take their skill for granted as it comes so naturally after years of mastery. This book confirms and reflects all the skills expressed in nursing and reframed into coaching language.

Boundaries, healthy communication, and listening are the foundation of healing and establishing rapport; trust and empathy are underscored well in this book.

I particularly like the approach of the authors towards organizational dilemmas, coaching through transitions for teams, and ensuring successful change management.

There are many concepts touched upon in this book that would be familiar with those working in organizational development and learning specialties.

While this book is aimed at Executive Nursing Leaders, I would strongly recommend this book to any nurse who wishes to learn, grow and become a leader in their specialization with a view to progressing towards a management role. I consider this book one of the best I have read for Nursing Executive Leaders, and Nursing Managers who would like to develop their own personal presence and self awareness to increase not only their effectiveness in their roles, but to re-ignite their passion for the work they do. I recognize in this book the power to move nurses into possibility thinking, and how coaching can provide a respite and way of being that will improve their working relationships with patients and health care colleagues.

For leaders who are interested in becoming more coach like or embracing coaching as a point of differentiation for themselves, this book will provide both inspiration and practical tools.

The Book's Authors Respond
Typically, when Peer Resources receives a review of a book or other resource, we send it to the book's author or publisher for reaction, feedback or comment with the intention to include their comments with the review. The authors, Kimberly McNally, MN, RN, BCC & Liz Cunningham, MA, RN, BCC, responded to this review:

We appreciate the thoughtful and thorough way our book was reviewed and how the reviewer highlighted the multiple ways coaching can impact leadership at an individual and organizational level. Using a coaching mindset and approach can facilitate employee engagement and satisfaction, successful change management, and solving organizational dilemmas in a new way as we all work toward transforming health care. We're delighted the reviewer recognizes the audience for this book extends beyond executive nursing leaders to a broad range of clinical and administrative healthcare leaders who have also found it valuable.

About the Review Author
Deb Kinvig has a professional career in both nursing (RN/RPN) and as a sworn Police Officer, internationally over the past 30 years. She is a Professionally Certified Solution Focused Coach and Professional Executive Coach with a Bachelors Degree in Nursing and a Master of Arts Degree in Leadership through Royal Roads University. Deb is a Clinical Leader in forensic mental health nursing, and is committed to supporting others to reach their personal and professional potential and creating organizations that are great places to work. (Note: This review was provided by the reviewer in exchange for a no-cost copy of the book.)

Ordering Alternatives:


 
Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a Time
Bob and Megan Tschannen-Moran
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This book is a masterpiece. A must read for every educator, and a useful tool for every school district. It is positive, enlightening, and the questions for reflection and discussion at the end of every chapter could be used successfully by professional learning communities operating in many schools today. Evocative Coaching truly is a way of being. Bob and Megan are to be commended for their excellent work.

Evocative Coaching is defined as: "Calling forth motivation and movement in people, through conversation and a way of being, so desired outcomes and achievements enhance the quality of life." The focus in this book is on how coaches can improve their relationship with teachers, thereby enabling teachers to improve their own performance. One common thread running through this entire process is positive dialogue.

Coaching can begin when trust is established, strength building encouraged, and when conversations focus on people rather than projects. The authors envision an environment in which learning is transformed and school environments are reinvented; where schools are a place for reflection, empathy, and inquiry.

Using the process of "Story-Empathy-Inquiry-Design" (S-E-I-D). an environment is established that leads to discovery. People always have stories to tell and when the stories are shared in a non judgemental environment schools are transformed through conversation. The evocative coaches take time to listen and learn from the stories, to express empathy, and to ask questions. There are no judgements made, only time to think and plan for what might be the next step. I will incorporate this idea by asking the teachers I work with to tell me a story about why they are in this profession, what motivates them to get up in the morning, what keeps them up at night, and how they react when a student "finally" grasps a concept.

The evocative coaching idea reintroduces the 4,000 year old Mobius design. Evocative Coaching like the Mobius strip dwells in endless possibilities. It gets teachers excited about learning as they become even more skilled in their profession. It's done through listening rather than talking, asking rather than telling, and reflecting rather than commenting. It's about enabling teachers to figure out how they can do what they want to serve students better - one conversation at a time. (Review by Peer Resources Network member, D. Vonde)

Ordering Alternatives:


 
Seal the Deal: The Essential Mindsets for Growing Your Professional Service Business
Suzi Pomerantz
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]Seal the Deal! (2007) by coach Suzi Pomerantz, an Executive Coach and a Peer Resources Network member is an introductory book written to help coaches learn to sell their services to organizations. While the book was originally targeted for the sole practitioner or small group that wants to sell services at the executive or HR level of organizations, feedback indicates that not only do less experienced coaches value the book, but also successful practitioners, consultants and other solopreneurs in professional service business are relying on the principles and practices detailed in the book.

The book can be used as a 10-week program to help readers launch their sales approach. Each chapter begins with a transcript from a telecourse on a given topic, followed by key points, homework exercises, and worksheets.

Ms. Pomerantz addresses the differences between sales, marketing, and networking. She then describes how to target prospects and contact them to ask for a meeting. She discusses how to handle the gatekeepers in an organization and provides guidelines for follow up and tracking. Samples of proposals are provided, and she discusses contracting and pricing.

The content of the book is most appropriate for the beginning coach or for a coach who experiences particular anxiety about selling. Many of the concepts will be familiar to those who have taken business courses. However, the book is unique in that the coaching format literally coaches the reader through their fears and into the action phase of selling. Also, the challenges and struggles of the telecourse participants help the reader to normalize anxieties about selling and to "feel the fear and do it anyway." A reader who follows the guidelines and completes the assignments will finish the program with a personal action plan and with new experience in identifying and contacting target markets.

Peer Resources Network members can obtain a set of powerpoint slides and handouts from the book by contacting Rey Carr for the special URL's for PRN members. (Review by Peer Resources Network member, R. Berry, Ph.D.)

Ordering Alternatives:
  • For additional reviews or purchase: Amazon.com
  • HRD Press, Inc, 2006 (A good source for bulk discounts on multiple copy orders.)


 
Adaptive Coaching: The Art and Practice of a Client-Centered Approach to Performance Improvement
Terry R. Bacon and Karen I. Spear
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]Every once in a while, a book comes along that puts it all together. This is the book. In the past ten years, the coaching industry has experienced tremendous growth. Personal coach training programs seem to be popping up everywhere. With the current trendiness of coaching in Fortune 500 companies, it's not surprising that "coaching" has become a buzzword that begs a definition.

Bacon and Spear have defined how coaching is practiced in the real world. They postulate that coaching falls into two camps: "directive" and "non-directive." Coaches who use a directive approach believe that they help best by using their knowledge and experience to tell, teach, and advise a client what to do. Coaches who use a non-directive approach believe that they help best by asking questions and listening. They stimulate a client to think, reflect, and learn from their own experiences.

Coaches tend to prefer one method over the other. In that lies the problem. According to the authors, a coach's preferred style tends to come from the coach's own experience with learning, rather than from the preference of the person they are coaching.

During the years 1996-2002, Bacon and Spear's professional development firm, The Lore International Institute, surveyed over 2000 Fortune 500 executives who received coaching along with the executive coaches who delivered it. The results were eye opening. Of the executives who received coaching, 57% said they would like more coaching; 60% said they would like better coaching; 56% said their coaching was not focused on the right things; and 45% said that getting coaching with their current coach has not had much positive impact on their work performance. With all the hype about "coaching," these results are dismal at best. The authors suggest that a big reason for the poor results is the way that coaching is being delivered. Of the executive coaches surveyed, 59% said they coach using a directive style. However, of the executives who received coaching, 65% said they prefer a non-directive style, and even more, 83%, said they prefer "a coach who asks questions to help me explore issues myself."

These results show how organizations are missing the boat when it comes to delivering an effective coaching program. Bacon and Spear set up the foundation of their adaptive coaching approach by providing a taxonomy of eight coaching styles. Four styles are directive and four are non-directive. The names assigned to each style might be debatable; however, the distinctions are good ones. Any coach should easily recognize his or her preference and whether they stick predominantly to one style. In order to deliver the most effective coaching, the trick is to adapt to the style preferred by the client being coached. Comprehensive assessments and asking the right questions are the tools necessary to discover a client's preference.

Clearly, Bacon and Spear show the need for incorporating more non-directive coaching. They also present solid information on the primary skills (listening, asking questions, giving feedback) and they give excellent sample dialogue for using non-directive coaching. They provide a holistic view of the ideal coaching process from the assessment stage, the ongoing dialogue, and closure. One thing I might add is that good experiential training and real world experience are the probably the best ways to develop non-directive coaching skills.

Even though Bacon and Spear show the need for more non-directive coaching, they also show that one out five still prefer directive coaching. Excellent training programs that focus solely on the non-directive approach are certifying many new coaches. These coaches need to recognize when to adapt their style when working with clients who prefer the directive approach. Many clients prefer and need both types of coaching at different times in a coaching relationship.

The section on coaching special populations is a real bonus. Reading it definitely increased my awareness and got me thinking about my own limited perspective when coaching someone from a different culture, status, gender, age, or race. Bacon and Spear offer great insights on how to be more cautious, but effective, in coaching people with significantly different backgrounds.

The seasoned coach will definitely gain new insights, and the novice will shorten the learning curve considerably. The book is well researched, and the references in the back are worth the price of admission for any coach who wishes to dive deeper into specific areas like coaching CEOs or the culturally different. (Review by Peer Resources Network member, Michael Chiodi.)

Ordering Alternatives:


 
Becoming a Professional Coach: Lessons from the Institute of Life Coach Training
Patrick Williams and Diane S. Menendez
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]Written by two members of the Peer Resources Network both master certified coaches, this book details the basic principles and crucial strategies that they have taught to thousands of coaches over the years. Beginning with a brief history of the foundations of coaching and its future trajectory, the authors take readers step-by-step through the coaching process, covering all the crucial ideas and strategies for being an effective, successful life coach, including: listening to, versus listening for, versus listening with; establishing a client's focus; giving honest feedback and observation; formulating first coaching conversations; asking powerful, eliciting questions; understanding human developmental issues; reframing a client's perspective; enacting change within clients; and helping clients to identify and fulfill core values.
Ordering Alternatives:
  • For additional reviews or purchase: W.W. Norton & Company (A 20 percent discount is currently available)


 
Total Life Coaching: 50+ Life Lessons, Skills, and Techniques to Enhance Your Practice...and Your Life
Patrick Williams and Lloyd C. Thomas
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]Total Life Coaching provides an in depth review of the essential skills and best practices needed to develop your "authentic" self. As a person considering a career in Life Coaching I have gained a broader understanding of the skills and techniques required by a life coach. The lessons and their messages become clear when one recalls that "Life is continuously providing us with information or messages. When we do not listen, the messages become lessons.When we do not learn, the lessons become problems. When we don't address the problems, they become crisis. When crisis are left unresolved, they create chaos in our lives." Total Life Coaching provides us with a foundation and an insight to begin living life at the lesson and message level avoiding life's chaos. Although I would consider this book a more valuable resource for a practicing coach it could be used by an individual on their own path of self discovery. There is much information to absorb and therefore this book is not a quick read but rather a resource to be used time and time again.

Total Life Coaching is a step by step guide through 52 of life's most essential lessons divided into eight chapters. Each of the "Life lessons" explores theory, includes practical examples, exercises, and a sample coaching conversation. The authors did a great job at the end of each section by incorporating a "coaching summary" which could be used as a quick reference point depending on the individual coaching situation. The book can be read cover to cover or coaches can choose lesson and apply the principles to individual situations. (Review by Peer Resources Network member, Elodie Jordens. Members receive free copies of books in exchange for a review.)

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Body-Centered Coaching: Using the Body as a Resource for Change
Marlena Field
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover of coaching book]While written for coaches, anyone that reads this book can benefit from its content. The book is about listening to your body, and the inter-relationship of body, mind and spirit. It is about incorporating the internal and external body sensations and experiences into the coaching process. The essence of the book is perhaps best stated in Marlena Field's words at the end of Chapter12: "Your body is full of wisdom and information when you take the time to slow down and purposely listen. Your body also needs to be acknowledged and appreciated for the signals it sends."

The book is first about the "being" of coaching, for as Marlena says "Who you are being as a coach is one of the greatest assets that you bring to your clients."

A key aspect of coaching is that of listening. Therefore, it is only fitting that the book opens with a chapter on the impact of "empowering and disempowering" listening. An example of disempowered listening is when we "perceive our clients as people who need fixing or need our guidance and advice." Coach Field states, "Your way of being as a listener directly impacts your clients and has the power to impact them positively or negatively." She gives the reader exercises and suggestions to help develop the skill and positive impact of empowered listening. While listening we can either choose to focus on the story or the storyteller. By focusing on the storyteller we stay connected to their internal experience rather than the details of the story. One way that Coach Field suggests we stay connected to the client is to use short contact statements which acknowledge the emotion, do not interrupt the moment, yet allow space for the client to go to a deeper level of insight and sharing.

To encourage the client to be aware of their mind-body-spirit inter-connections, Field suggests that we first begin within. She gives us eight ways to practice "mindfulness" and be more fully aware of what we, as coaches, are sensing in our bodies. Using these techniques, the coach can then explore a variety of possibilities and decision-making procedures with their clients. Through the process of mindfulness, coaches help clients become aware of their "disempowering beliefs" and have them proceed to embody more "empowering beliefs."

Field uses the term "con-fusions" to illustrate how we often associate concepts and ideas, such as anger with hurtful, or crying with weakness. She introduces a great exercise to bring an awareness of what we create, or resist because of these "con-fusions." In Field's words, "Confusions, once realized, have the potential for clients to empower themselves."

Building on previously developed techniques, Coach Field leads the reader through the use of "inspired visualizations," that help clients deal with strong emotions and she describes the concept of "embracing the signals" that our body sends. As Field says, "...when you are really stressed and 'out of control', your shoulders may typically become very stiff and sore. Rather than being angry with your shoulders, another perspective could be to be thankful that they are giving you a warning signal to calm down and find a way to relax. This is a holistic way to look after your physical and your emotional well-being."

We often adopt body positions when in a particular mood or perspective. A coach can help the client embody a new perspective by having them change their body position. Marlena Field walks us through a process to help clients "...experience an intentional body perspective shift."

Marlena Field's book is a very informative yet easy read. It is not only full of tips and techniques to help the coach be in service to the client, it also gives real-life examples. Field has provided fifteen "coach - client" interactions that demonstrate how the techniques are used. I believe this is a very powerful addition to any coach's library, filled with useful tips that can be used immediately with self and clients. The book is available in either soft-cover or PDF format. (Review by Peer Resources Network member Bryan Gorrie, MA, CPCC, PCC)

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What Next? The Complete Guide to Taking Control of Your Working Life
Barbara Moses, Ph.D.
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]In the five years that Peer Resources has provided a Find-A-Mentor service, requests for mentors have come from students starting a career path, employees changing jobs, veteran workers seeking different opportunities, and executives hoping to build a better career path. What tied this diverse group together was that they typically shared the same reasons for seeking a mentor: (1) finding a way to transfer their dreams into practice; and (2) finding a way to live a more authentic life in their work.

Working with a mentor or a coach is an excellent choice for accomplishing either of these goals, and in her latest book, What Next? The Complete Guide to Taking Control of Your Working Life, Dr. Barbara Moses provides the mentoring and coaching necessary to help people learn to live authentically and turn their dreams into reality. No other book on the market can provide individuals with the awareness, options, skills, and understanding necessary to deal with the bewildering array of challenges and opportunities in today's shifting work world. A virtual bible of resources, this book features self-assessment tools, quizzes, examples, guided exercises, diagnostic instruments, career wisdom based on tough realities, and tips on how to keep from getting derailed and how to overcome career challenges such as burn-out, boredom, and lack of passion.

Dr. Moses, called a Career Guru by Fast Company magazine, believes that the key to both successful career growth and life choices is for individuals to arm themselves with protective skills and act as their own career activists. She identifies 12 career strategies starting with building on your own skills, talents and strengths to finding a mentor to learning how to deal with disappointment, stressful situations and pressure. In addition she identifies eight key motivators that often work in combination or can contradict each other, but can assist individuals to find the best possible match between what drives them and a suitable work environment.

This book is not only of value to individuals at various stages of work life, but is a powerful resource for coaches, mentors, human resources personnel, and others who are in a position to influence the career development of their clients, colleagues and co-workers. The attractive style of the book with its top quality photographs and illustrations make it an excellent gift for graduates whose parents are wondering and worrying about the future course chosen by their "I'm taking a year off to go to travel with my roommate" son or daughter. But if parents start to read it before passing it on to their progeny, they too will find ideas, practical suggestions, and wisdom that can impact their own work life. It's likely that buying two copies will be necessary.

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Coaching Leaders: Guiding People Who Guide Others
Daniel White (Foreward by Marshall Goldsmith)
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]Written for coaches who are in the challenging position of working with leaders and helping them excel as the top executives and managers in their organizations. The book is filled with illustrative examples from Daniel White's practice as a successful executive coach. His clients' stories reveal the human drama of becoming a leader and explore the courageous and fascinating accomplishments these individuals have achieved in order to grow professionally. These stories also clearly show how a skilled coach adjusts to meet an individual client's personality and targeted challenge. The book includes a wide variety of effective coaching concepts and the information needed to guide leaders and help them maintain the motivation to change; battle anxiety, fear, and resistance; and achieve emotional intelligence.
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  • For additional reviews or purchase: Amazon.com or Amazon.ca
  • Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series 2005


 
Executive Coaching: Practices and Perspectives
Catherine Fitzgerald and Jennifer Garvey Berger
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This is an academic book with something of interest and use for almost anyone, including human resources executives responsible for bringing effective coaching into their organizations.

Fitzgerald and Berger, a mother-daughter team, compiled sixteen chapters written by twenty contributors, including themselves. The chapters are divided into five parts: Executive Coaching Perspectives, Executive Coaching Practices, Managing Executive Coaching in Organizations, Executive Coaching Issues, and Special Coaching Situations. Topics from the different parts of the book include: "The Coach as Reflective Practitioner," "Understanding and Supporting Development of Executives at Midlife," "Using Executive Coaching in Organizations: What Can Go Wrong (and How to Prevent It)," "Failure and Negative Outcomes: The Taboo Topic in Executive Coaching," and "Coaching across Countries and Cultures." Each chapter ends with conclusions, notes and references to cited sources.

The editors' and other contributors' chapters on adult development and complexity of mind issues in coaching are especially fascinating. These approaches support transformative change in the client-executives and will help coaches themselves as reflective practitioners. For example, Robert Kegan's psychological constructive-development theory will help a coach identify and support an executive whose order of mind is at odds with what the executive's organization demands of the executive. Carl Jung's theories of the qualitative difference in the second half of life (at midlife, an adult will want to bring a larger sense of self into the world) can be used to help coaches to understand how an executive's desire to develop less developed parts of self mesh with the demands of the organization.

The book is also packed with nuts and bolts lessons, lists, and tables for executive coaches. For example, David Coleman presents six principles for thinking about client issues: some weaknesses are strengths overdone, persistent behaviors most likely have positive purposes, assuming similarities when they do not exist can lead to unrealistic expectations and conflict, an outdated view of the self can lead to behaviors that are disproportionate to current reality, being both differentiated and connected is essential for effective leadership, and the ability to see one’s responsibility in each situation and the willingness to take calculated risks are key to making progress. Susan Ennis' well-explicated steps for ensuring success of an organization's executive coaching program (link executive coaching to business strategy, identify a pool of potential coaches, screen potential coaches, bring the coach up to speed, match the executive to the coach, keep the coaching engagement on track, and measure results will be of great assistance to HR personnel. (Review by Coach Gini Nelson, a member of the Peer Resources Network.)

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Coaching that Counts: Harnessing the Power of Leadership Coaching to Deliver Strategic Value
Dianna Anderson and Merrill Anderson
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]The popularity of leadership coaching has spawned a multitude of books on the subject, most of which focus on how to become a successful coach. Notably missing from the bookstore shelves are works that illuminate the coaching experience from the perspective of the leaders who receive coaching and books that provide research about how coaching creates value for the individuals and organizations who invest in coaching. This book, authored by a husband and wife team, answers three of the big questions now being asked about leadership coaching: (1) What do leaders experience through the process of coaching? (2) What needs to be done to manage coaching as a strategic initiative? and (3) How does coaching add value for individuals and organizations?

Merrill Anderson, an internationally recognized as the leading evaluator of corporate coaching initiatives, and Dianna Anderson, a Master Certified Coach, build on their collective years of experience, insight and research to provide a practical, user-friendly exploration of leadership coaching. Coaches, coaching initiative managers and business leaders will find great value in this book.

In the first section of the book the Andersons present an empirically-based client-centered model of coaching that clearly reveals what coaches and their clients need to do to achieve transformational change. The fact that this model is empirically-based is important, because it has face validity and resonates with the reader's experience. The model reveals the underlying dynamics that make leadership coaching such a powerful development tool, including the process of translating ever deepening insight into meaningful action. The second section speaks to those who manage large scale coaching initiatives. In this section the Andersons clearly demonstrate the steps that need to be taken to ensure that coaching programs deliver strategic value. In the third section the authors address the value that coaching delivers to the bottom-line. They provide practical, real-world tools and methods that enable the reader to demonstrate the ROI of a coaching initiative. They also provide a powerful business case for leadership coaching, based on the latest ROI studies of coaching that the authors have conducted.

I have first hand knowledge of the practicality of the tools and methods introduced in Coaching That Counts. Approximately one year ago, I worked with Merrill Anderson to assess the business impact of my firm's executive coaching program. The ROI exceeded 600%. Not only did the study validate anecdotal data we had collected about the value of the coaching program, it also provided us with ideas for program enhancements. Here is the bottom-line: this book is a must-read for coaches who are working in organizations, for managers of coaching initiatives, and for learning leaders who need to articulate the value of coaching for the business. (This review was written by Vernita Parker-Wilkins, an Executive Development Manager with Booz Allen Hamilton and is reproduced here with permission.)

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The Coward's Guide to Conflict: Empowering Solutions for Those Who Would Rather Run Than Fight (Coaching Conversations for Personal and Business Success)
Dr. Tim Ursiny
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]In the midst of our fast food, fast paced, noisy, wired world of seemingly endless choices, we often look to recapture a time when life was simpler and we received valuable insights that resulted not from having more choices but from being in relationships with people who "knew things." They offered insight, encouragement and time to share their knowledge, experience and vulnerability in a way that encouraged us to try new things that would make our lives better.

Tim Ursiny "knows things." The Coward's Guide to Conflict is indeed a solid resource explaining the value of, purpose for, and resolution of conflict in our daily interactions. Dr. Ursiny begins each chapter with an example from his own personal experience and provides illustrative examples from a professional coaching perspective. He encourages those who want to flee, to "see in new ways." A key reframe in the book is to view conflict resolution as a basis for an improved life whether at work or at home. The chapter titles in the 283-page book deal directly and compassionately with the subject addressed: "The Coward Test," "How to Make Conflict Less Frightening...quickly," and "If Common Sense Is So Common, Then Why Don't They Have It?" The four main sections of the book cover personal choices about conflict, motivating oneself for dealing with conflict, common causes of conflict, and techniques to handle any conflict.

Offering the techniques as the last section of the book is one way that this book stands out from many other "self help," formulaic, or "paint by number" types. Dr. Ursiny first addresses the fears and misbeliefs around conflict, gives readers choices about how they might explore this topic and then supports those choices with solid, compassionate teaching. As a coach he expects that readers will participate in their learning by using the exercises in each chapter as a vehicle for personal reflection and individual growth and development. He is also generous in offering "next steps" and additional resources from other authors with supporting information as well as real life examples and charts/worksheets that can be used for personal application.

The publicity on the back cover categorizes the book as: "Business, Self help." While accurate, the book has far greater scope. It could be used as a textbook in high school and college classrooms, required reading in pre-marriage classes, a communication primer for those starting a business, and certainly as a training guide in business and non-profit organizations to name a few.

On a personal note the book was a real "eye opener" to this reviewer's conflict-shy husband of 28 years and led to many deep conversations that resulted in positive changes. (Editor's Note: When Tim Ursiny read this review, he said, "The reviewer's reaction and the aid it provided at home is exactly the reason why I wrote the book!") (Review by Coach Ingrid Kutsch, a member of the Peer Resources Network.)

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Quiet Leadership: Six Steps to Transforming Performance at Work
David Rock
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]In a recent conversation with a friend, I shared my plan to visit someone who lived near Sedona in Arizona. Having visited there herself, she immediately began advising me about the spots I must see. I found myself mildly irritated. Over the years I had developed the habit of researching and planning my own trips. I already knew what I wanted to do.

In this book David Rock describes my well-developed habit as hard-wired. In Part One (of three) in his 241-page book he explains our hard-wired habits through the current literature and research about our brains. He makes the major point that if you want to help people change, help them think better and don't tell them what to do. He points out that it is just too difficult for people to change deeply entrenched behaviors. Advice just won't work. What does work is to help people create new behaviors by assisting them through their thinking for a self-selected goal. This explains my irritation at unsolicited advice toward a non-existing goal. How do we assist people to achieve a goal without advising?

The author addresses this question in Part Two where he linearly describes six steps to facilitate someone's self-directed learning process. For example, the first step focuses on how to assist people in improving the way they think rather than on what they think. He gives the reader clearly explained ways to accomplish this through scripted dialogues, examples from his own coaching experiences, and personal exercises to anchor the concepts. Once the six steps are mastered, they can be used interchangeably.

The interchangeability of the steps are effectively integrated in Part Three where the author models applications to solving problems, making decisions, giving feedback, working with teams, and communicating with children. Most of the examples are culled from the corporate world. However, since the steps are well-thought out and practical, I found it easy to adapt this model to the educational coaching I do in schools. I particularly liked the section on communicating with children and recommended the book to a parent struggling with a lack of academic motivation in her teenaged son.

Unlike velcro, advice just doesn't stick. It irritates and pushes people away. Yet, we live in a culture which idolizes and pays for expertise. And when we know a lot we want to share it. We who are coaches are the most useful to our clients, however, when we use what we know to help our clients think through what they are not yet aware they know. Quiet Leadership is a useful resource for beginning and veteran coaches who desire to build their expertise without the use of advice. (Review by Dr. Aili Pogust, a member of the Peer Resources Network.)

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  • For additional reviews or purchase: Amazon.com
  • Harper Collins, 2006


 
Coach Anyone about Anything: How to Help People Succeed in Business and Life
Germaine Porché and Jed Niederer
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]Whereas the Wizard of Oz ended with Todo pulling back the curtain to reveal how the magic was accomplished, this book starts with the curtain open to reveal the simplicity and elegance of what is involved in coaching. Help is now available to all those people who have been coaching without knowing that's what it was called. And both the novice and experienced coach can achieve results on a scale much grander than they had imagined. The authors provide a variety of easy-to-follow coaching tools, forms, and concepts that are based on their experience training thousands of professional and first-time coaches. Their brief examples from clients, action exercises for readers, clear definitions, practical tips, and illustrated models really will help in coaching anyone about anything. There is even a chapter devoted to coaching over the telephone, one of the most popular ways to deliver coaching today. Although the title of this book implies a limitless approach to coaching, the authors make it clear in the book that you can coach anyone about anything especially if you have their permission and cooperation. This book is suitable for CEOs making changes, managers motivating teams, human resources professionals, corporate coaches and trainers, entrepreneurs, consultants working with clients, parents of teenagers and anyone else responsible for the success of others.
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The CCL Handbook of Coaching. A Guide for the Leader Coach
Sharon Ting and Peter Scisco (Editors)
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This may be more of a personal disclaimer than a thoughtful review. And it perhaps points to a lack of rigor or motivation exerted on the part of this reviewer, but this book has been a millstone. One I have tried to ignore save for the gentle reminders of my original good intentions by Rey Carr.

I have picked this book up several times over the past year and have quickly put it down after futile page thumbing to get into it. My earnest reading of the introduction and sections hinting of help for my interests brought forth no hint of practical help or urgency to give it a good read. Now I believed my initial need was genuine when I spotted the title as I was dealing with a number of teams with cross cultural members who where having difficulty relating to each other. Eager for some intervention direction I anticipated something of value would be quickly inherent given the title and group behind it. Perhaps I was looking for that magic pill given the stellar reputation of the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL), but the magic or at least insight for my next group intervention was certainly not forthcoming, not even a glimmer of possibility caught my attention.

I did consider the CCL coaching model of assessment - support - challenge leading to results, all governed by relationship, as backdrop to my own self coaching to get on with my review and took particular notice at the suggestion that while the mind set model is evident, its application effectiveness is less obvious. This stimulus to practiconer self-reflection caused me some disequilibrium and I once again delved into the 466 pages. With new resolve I looked again at Chapter 5, Coaching Across Cultures. Yes, coaching across cultures is more complex and puts added burden on the assessment and relationship aspects of coaching but where is the down and dirty? With gritted persistence I checked out Part Four: Coaching Techniques. The chapters on Artful Coaching, Brief solution Coaching and Constructive-Development Coaching held out some allure for my attention span. But, sadly no cigar; smoke but no fire; stuff to ponder but not the toolkit I wanted to monkey with.

Now this I realize is about my struggle and capacity to extract useful instruction to guide my next moves and certainly not any condemnation of the good folks at CCL. I throw in the possibility of a lack of imagination as well. I just could not get into this book or find it offered much beyond a good coverage of the CCL's coaching model along with a few alternatives and other cerebral content.

For a book with the title "A Guide For The Leader Coach," I expected a more pragmatic content and feel. I can't see this book being of immediate use to the "leaders and bosses who are engaged in formal and informal ongoing coaching opportunities with their direct reports" as the book cites in its Introduction to be the primary audience. The fires are burning and the bosses need a quick extinguisher not a lengthy discourse (pun on course not intended) on coaching. Perhaps presented as a course it would be more attractive, but the bottom line for me: this is a dry, encyclopedic tomb. For the practicing 'boss' it would be far more productive, and entertaining to pick up one of those successful athletic coach's 'lessons on leadership and coaching' books that seem endless in their availability. (Editor's Note: based on this review, this book would normally not have been placed in the "Top Books" section; but given the high profile nature of the CCL, we have included it here for reference. The CCL did not respond to our request for comments or reactions to this review.) (Review by Peer Resources Network member, R. Dyke)

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The Mindful Coach: Seven Roles for Helping People Grow
Douglas K. Silsbee
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]The Mindful Coach explores the concepts of coaching (as demonstrated in many types of helping relationships), "mindfulness," and service. The author emphasizes the philosophy and practice of mindfulness, which is defined as "the state of awareness in which we are conscious of our feelings, thoughts, and habits of mind, and able to let unhelpful ones go so that they no longer limit us." Mindfulness has us analyze our consciousness, beyond such things as racial or gender bias. It is a disciplined approach to self-knowledge, requiring effort to learn and effort to apply the learning, in order to develop new habits of thought. In this way, we give ourselves the ability to consciously choose responses other than those we might unconsciously have chosen before. These concepts are applied to seven roles or "Voices" in coaching. The roles are: Master, Partner, Investigator, Reflector, Teacher, Guide and Contractor. Each voice represents a different roles that the coach can and does play at different times. It is important to have the all seven voices, according to the author, because a specific focus of mindfulness attaches to each role. The seven roles comprise his coaching model, and the Master is the umbrella role that supports all the others. The other six represent specific elements of coaching, identifiable by actions and choices of words. The Investigator, for example, asks questions to support the client's deeper understanding, challenging the client to look at the situation differently.

While there is substantial philosophy and some hard science relating to mindfulness (such as adult complexity of mind, emotional intelligence theory), it is not yet widely discussed in mainstream society. This book is a good introduction to those who have some curiosity about mindfulness, and it is an important resource to those who want to incorporate it into their own practice. It is filled with specific and concrete strategies, exercises and tools. (Review provided by Peer Resources Network member, G. Nelson.)

The author, Doug Silsbee, after reading this review, replied:

Thanks for the intelligent review of the book. I appreciate the reviewer's recognition of the distinction between the perceptions of mindfulness as self-absorption and mindfulness as a disciplined approach to self-knowledge and a reflection of rigorous commitment to service toward our clients. This, I think, is rarely stated explicitly in the coaching literature. Mindfulness is both a cornerstone of our own path of development as coaches, and of our ability to be fully present with those we are coaching. Truly, the two are inseparable.

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Performance Coaching: The Handbook for Managers, HR Professionals and Coaches
Angus McLeod
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]As more organizations and managers begin to understand the value that coaching can bring to an organization and its employees, the need to communicate the tools and techniques used by practitioners to the non coaching community increases. Angus McLeod has provided such a resource with this book. Even the seasoned coach can find opportunities to improve some of their skills by analyzing the cases and solutions presented.

The book is well structured for the individual who is being introduced to coaching for the first time. The nine chapters and six appendices cover the entire range of coaching from how the term coach originated to providing examples of how coaching can be successfully used via the internet. The case based process used by the author provides the reader with proven coaching techniques and demonstrates how they might be used in different situations. A wide variety of 'coachees', as Dr. McLeod refers to his clients, as well as an equally wide range of organizations provide many opportunities for readers to relate personally to the case studies. Every reader should be able to relate to at least one of the case study situations.

In addition to using case studies, specific coaching linguistic tips are explained in the book. These coaching tips are highlighted and fully explained in easy to understand terminology. An appendix allows the reader to quickly find a specific tip if you wish to refer back to it.

Dr. McLeod provides a large menu of coaching skills and techniques in this book. He discusses the key concepts of Neuro-Linguistic Programming and demonstrates possible uses in a coaching situation. What I especially liked about this book is that the reader is provided with a wide variety of tools based upon sound principals.The author does not instill his personal coaching style into the material and leaves it up to the reader to decide what coaching approach might best work for them. The other satisfying aspect of the author's approach is that he often provides the reader with the results of actual coaching interventions based upon use of the coaching skills he discusses.

Human Resource professionals and managers will find this book easy to refer to as needed. For potential coaches and students who are studying in the area of training and performance improvement, this book places all necessary information at their fingertips. The appendices are full of valuable information including a detailed listing of web resources. The glossary is also extremely helpful to the non-professional coaching community. (Review completed by Peer Resources Network member, Dave Fountaine, SPHR.)

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The Art of Building People: 36 Coaching Tools to get more out of work and life.
Michael Chiodi
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This small book is like a basic wrench set for coaching. It has 36 elemental, adaptable and easy to understand "tools to help people reach greater levels of success". This is not a "How to..." book. The introduction states it should not be read cover to cover. The author addresses seven areas, including: self awareness tools such as "cooling off," "body wisdom," "feel the fear;" visioning and life purpose tools such as "goals vs. intention" and "whose goal is it?" and action tools such as "creativity hour," "super-response day," and purposeful brain-storming.

Each coaching tool has its own set of structured questions and assignments. One example in the Self Care tools category is PLUG YOUR ENERGY DRAINS (p.51). The author explains how a plastic bag, that was snagged in a tree branch, irritated him for three years every time he looked out of his living room window. Once the bag disintegrated in the 4th summer, he realized how much energy this little bag sapped from him. Why didn't he call the store manager to deal with their litter? Why didn't he trim his own branch and improve the view? Could he have re-framed it for himself, perhaps as a science project to see how long a plastic bag takes to degrade?

Chiodi asks the reader: What "plastic bags" are sapping your energy? What are you putting up with ? Can you change your thinking about an annoyance that is difficult to eliminate? How can you make peace with it? How does clutter affect your energy? One of the assignments created by Chiodi for this category includes: eliminating five of the easiest "energy drains" on your list; noticing how better you feel; and scheduling ways to plug each of your other energy drains.

The brevity and simplicity of this book are wonderful. It is especially well-suited as an elegant reminder to a coach who has already worked with a similar tool during coach training. For example, the book will remind the reader to be creative, take a risk, make a plan, or have some fun. But if the client has a barrier to these angles, getting them to be creative will require more penetrating work than just suggesting they be more creative!

The absence of detail has made this tiny book a fast and easy read, and a great jump-start for those who don't/can't bother with bigger books. If the reader uses the suggested novel (or refreshed) tools on themselves, Chiodi provides the space for the willing reader to explore the depths of its insight and learn of the potential firsthand. (Review provided by Peer Resources Network member, S. Drinnan.

The author of this book, Michael Chiodi, in reading this review made the following comments: The word "coaching" these days is being used for a variety of different ways to help other people. Many "trained coaches" would like to define "coaching" as a specific style or approach. Unfortunately, with so many consultants and managers accustomed to using an advice-based, directive coaching approach, I think that coaches trained in a specific style have an uphill battle to fight.

My book is a collection of tools for using a question-based, non-directive approach. It's intended to give untrained people who are new to coaching a good start with a more facilitative rather than advice-based style. Newly trained coaches using a question-based approach will immediately add useful tools to their arsenal. The book is not intended for seasoned coaches, however, they may find a few new questions and structures they haven't considered before.

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Leading from the Inside Out: A Coaching Model
Virginia E. Bianco-Mathis, Lisa K. Nabors and Cynthia H. Roman
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This practical book clearly and concretely presents the case for coaching as a transformational intervention. The authors demonstrate the power of coaching to bring about major changes in the way business is conducted and the way in which bottom line productivity goals, ethical practice, and spiritual fulfillment from work can be combined. While the book will be especially useful to coaches, managers and others in the business setting, it will be of great value to graduate students and other professionals, such as therapists and management consultants who wish to develop coaching skills and knowledge.

The authors define what coaching is and describe and illustrate the five key steps in the coaching process, including establishing the coaching relationship, collecting and analyzing data, processing feedback and planning action, taking action, and evaluating performance. Each of these five steps and their specific and concrete way of putting them into practice are applied to each of four major areas: (1) coaching the leader within – coaching a leader on the alignment of who and what he/she is and wants to be; (2) coaching the leader with others – the leader in relationship with others; (3) coaching the leader with the organization – coaching the leader to lead change and transform the organization; and (4) coaching the leader with the community – coaching the leader to leave an intentional legacy.

Each chapter addresses the process from the perspective of the coach and the leader, illustrates processes through examples and case studies, and provides hands-on exercises, tools, and techniques that can be readily used. An added benefit is that the authors use numerous real-life stories and cases from their own experience that illustrate the realities (both the pluses and challenges) of working with clients. The book also includes worksheets, job aids, scorecards, and other development tools to reinforce learning and enhance skills. Many books on leadership written by business professors aspire to provide evidence and insight to motivate leaders to take action. This book, however, actually provides not only the reasons for action, but also the full range of details as to how employees throughout a corporation can become leaders and sustain the qualities of leadership. (The authors are all partners in Strategic Performance Group.)

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How to Build Your Ideal Practice in 90 Days
David Steele
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This book is no longer available and has been updated to a new title, which will be reviewed soon to be considered for inclusion here. The review for the previous book said: One of the most frequently asked questions by people considering coaching as well as coaches new to the field is: "How to I get clients?" In this e-book, an experienced coach reveals the practical details about how to build a successful practice. The book includes brief lessons on every aspect of practice building. In addition the book includes a full refund guarantee. While the book is directed towards coaches, many other practitioners can benefit from the specific advice and information included in this book.
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Jesus, Life Coach: Learn from the Best
Lori Beth Jones
What's Hot About This Work?
Peer Resources Coaching Book ReviewLaurie Beth Jones is well known for earlier books including Jesus, CEO and The Path: Creating Your Mission Statement for Work and for Life. Recently I discovered her newest book Jesus, Life Coach. Jones writes that after "spending a lifetime studying the character of Jesus, and the better part of my career working with leaders, I have come to this conclusion. There is no better role model for coaching that gets lasting results than Jesus of Nazareth." In my opinion, the author makes too many references to her career and accomplishments. The Bible references that begin each chapter sometimes appear to be pulled out of context and forced to apply to coaching. Even so this book is practical, very readable, well-written, often captivating and filled with suggestions that can be useful for Christian coaches. It also could be a good tool for supplementing your coaching practice if you encourage clients to read the book and work through its exercises. In about 60 short chapters, Jones deals with life focus, balance, productivity, and fulfillment. This helpful book points to the mission statement of Jesus (John 10:10) and shows how his teachings better enable coaches to guide and stay with others on their life journeys. (This review was reprinted with the permission of its author, Gary R. Collins and originally appeared in his April 29, 2004 newsletter.)
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The Psychology of Executive Coaching: Theory and Application
Bruce Peltier
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This is not really a business book; it is more of an academic book, packed with references and recommended readings. It was written to help psychotherapists and other mental health professionals find ways to break into the field of executive coaching, and blend their skills with the corporate environment. I come from the corporate environment and have learned my skills through NLP and a wide reading in other applied fields, much of which has been built on the application of psychology to organisations and personal change. What Peltier has produced is a book that reviews the whole range of therapeutic psychology. In fact for a business reader it does the converse of its defined purpose and places executive coaching in the context of the source psychology. It brought me little that was new, but acted as a fascinating consolidation and revision. For coaches interested in learning how we got to where we are, or developing or revising their coaching skils, this is a fascinating read. As well as dealing with the psychological fields of the person-centred approach, cognitive psychology, family therapy and systems thinking, hypnotic communication, social psychology and the existential stance, it covers the difference between coaching and counselling, lessons from athletic coaches, ethics in coaching and making the transition from the world of therapy to the workplace world of the corporate coach. This is a serious, but not a difficult read. Not for the general reader, but well worthwhile to anyone who takes executive coaching seriously. It could well become a standard text on courses for executive coaches. (This review was written by Richard Winfield of the Brefi Group and originally appeared in their Corporate Coach E-newsletter. It is reproduced here in slightly modified form with the permission of the author.)
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The Coach's Handbook: Exercises for Resolving Conflict in the Workplace
Dr. Tim Ursiny
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]If a global definition of coaching is "bringing out the best in people," then the effective management of conflict, which is a natural and common element in business development, is a key area for coaches working with clients in the business world. But can coaches transcend their own fears regarding conflict or learn how to help others develop and grow when conflict occurs? Armed with experienced corporate coach Tim Ursiny's handbook, coaches will be able to understand and flex their own conflict management style and they will be able to coach clients to resolve conflicts effectively. This 83-page manual is organized into chapters that examine issues such as the coach's role in conflict, negative conflict styles, the impact of personality style, using feelings, fairness and integrity to talk about conflict, providing support, a list of the top ten mistakes made with upset people, and a list of additional resources and services. Each chapter starts with a real life example from a corporate environment then details appropriate coaching principles or models, followed by a series of exercises designed to stretch skills and deepen insights, and concludes with suggested activities to integrate these learnings into coaching practice. Throughout the book, Dr. Ursiny demonstrates a coaching stance by expecting the reader to (1) use the material as a source for reflection, growth and development rather than a set of rigid rules or prescribed action steps; and (2) be open to receiving coaching as well as "being" a coach.
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The Complete Guide to Coaching at Work and The Coaching at Work Toolkit: A Complete Guide to Techniques and Practices
Perry Zeus and Suzanne Skiffington
What's Hot About These Two Works?
[Book Cover][Book Cover]The Complete Guide is written in non-academic prose and filled with practical examples, case studies and check lists. Both authors have extensive coaching experience and in addition to writing this book provide coaching seminars and workshops, a coaching resource network, lectures, and a professional development club for coaches. Topics include business coaching, executive coaching, the manager as coach, coaching skills and issues. All of these chapters include relevant examples, practical guides, and well-organized writing.

The authors underscore the importance of coaching as a learning opportunity and show how to establish a learning culture, help businesses identify their learning strengths and weaknesses, recognize learning styles of both individuals and groups, and provide tips on how coaches can build on learning styles to help clients deal with obstacles, resistance, and other barriers. The book also includes a section on how coaching can be applied to the specific areas of call centres, sales, and career coaching. These unique applications reflect the authors' widespread experience, and at the same time highlight the ways in which coaching can be used to deal with modern technology as well as its potential outcomes such as job loss or change.

My experience as coach and mentor, however, suggests that the distinction that Zeus and Skiffington outline between the two roles is not so easily made. I have, in fact, used their excellent description of the personal qualities of a coach, given as a series of 'capacities,' in explaining what those seeking a mentor should look for. While I disagree with parts of the list of differences they have identified between coach and mentor, nonetheless, the list itself is explanatory of the role and skills of one and/or the other.

When the authors turn to the issue of leadership, they resort to models that have long since lost favor. It has been some time since McGregor's Theory X and Y have entered the dialogue on this continent. Lack of any mention of servant leadership is a significant failing since this model seems to be a perfect fit for the coach. The fit is evident in the authors' second book where the personality characteristics mirror those identified by Greenleaf (Servant Leadership: A Journey into the Nature of Legitimate Power and Greatness) and echoed by James Autry in The Servant Leader: How to Build a Creative Team, Develop Great Morale, and Improve Bottom Line Performance. Yet even here, there is no connection to the model of leadership that fits best.

The importance of context, the critical nature of the specific circumstance faced by the coach and partner, has become most evident in my work as coach. While one can learn from the experience of others, each coaching intervention must be tailored to the particular circumstance if it is to be of value. This is missing in The Guide.

In spite of these minor shortcomings, I found The Guide to be of great value in my work as coach, and I would recommend it to those who wish to explore this exciting and rewarding role.

While the second book by the same authors, The Toolkit, would logically seem to be a companion to The Guide, it appears almost as an afterthought. The first two chapters and parts of the remainder are little more than a recap of The Guide. In certain areas, the information is 'toned down' from The Guide to the point where it seems to emphasize the wrong point. For example, the section on the attributes of a coach in the first chapter places the emphasis on knowledge of the organization and organizational issues, whereas the description in The Guide is much more complete. The earlier book begins with self awareness as the first, and thus most important, characteristic, which I believe is correct.

From the third chapter on, The Toolkit covers material that is missing from the earlier book in considerable depth. While providing a complete compendium of tools, much of the book is conventional wisdom, quite basic, geared to the novice. The book might better be called a 'Primer' and geared to the beginning coach. For the person who comes to the profession with experience, there are other resources that serve better. For example, the book includes a section on meditation which one can learn more about by reading Buddhism. While chapter seven provides some help on self awareness, my study of religious systems and reflection on the messages has been my route to awareness of self. Lack of mention of the role of one's religious system is a shortcoming in this area.

The 'bottom line' for me? I have learned a good deal from The Guide that I have applied directly to my work as coach. I found The Toolkit to be of little extra help. I would strongly recommend the first book to all coaches, new and experienced. Those who are just getting into the game will benefit from both. (Review by Peer Resources Network member, Wayne Stewart.)

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Leading High Impact Teams: The Coach Approach to Peak Performance
Cynder Niemela and Rachael Lewis
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]When two master coaches, who between them have 50 years of experience, agree to share their wisdom in a practical and highly readable fashion, would you be willing to listen? And if their focus was how to create and maintain dream teams, would you be willing invest in a 200-page book? If you answered yes to either of these questions, then Leading High Impact Teams: The Coach Approach to Peak Performance by executive coaches Cynder Neimela and Rachel Lewis is definitely for you.

More coaches today are being asked to apply their results-oriented approach to groups, And while many coaches are successful with individual clients, too few have had the 100+ opportunities that these two authors have had in sharpening their work with groups, particularly using coaching to transform individuals into spectacular teams.

With an even greater number of organizations relying on teams to achieve their corporate goals, there is little room for experimentation or trial and error approaches. The authors of this book have provided hands on guidance for coaches by packing the book with specific, usable tools, ideas, assessments, checklists, key questions to ask, activities and case studies. No matter what stage you are in with team development, this book will take you from the murky novice to the accomplished practitioner.

This isn't a book about how to coach individuals within a team, although the authors do provide guidance here; this book is about how to create a coaching culture within a team; how to transform the attitudes and behaviours of the group to help the team achieve a real competitive advantage.

Until I read this book most of my work with teams was based on limited experience and voracious reading of virtually every published team-work tome. I struggled to help teams deal with "meetings where nothing seems to get done," "agreements that occurred with no follow through," "personality conflicts," "team members feeling pressured to take on more than they can handle," and many instances of team members "talking at each other instead of to each other."

Leading High Impact Teams uses anecdotes and stories that I would swear came from transcripts of my team coaching efforts. The toughness of some teams often led me to question my role and caused me to engage in activities that (with hindsight) seemed to conflict with coaching. Fortunately each chapter of this book offers specific help in the form of a coaching role overview, specific activities a coach can use to assist the team, and case stories that show how the ideas and reality are integrated.

As a result of reading this book, my confidence as a team coach has improved considerably. An additional bonus of this book is that the authors use nautical metaphors to help readers navigate through the various concepts and examples. Even the format of the book provides "anchors" in the margins to help readers chart their course. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to go beyond just staying afloat as a team coach. This book will help you navigate by the stars and help your team captain and crew gain exceptional wealth as a result of the journey. (...Read a chapter by chapter synopsis from the authors' website...)

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Executive Coaching with Backbone and Heart: A Systems Approach to Engaging Leaders with Their Challenges
Mary-Beth O'Neill
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This book provides deep and experienced insights into the pros and cons of executive coaching. The author identifies a set of core principles, such as (1) ensuring that coaches understand themselves (and what can happen if they ignore this area); (2) understanding the system within which an executive functions; and (3) learning to be a partner rather than imposing ideas. The book includes real life stories and vignettes, as well as a strong foundation of theory and method, and addresses the complex pulls on the coach involved in the executive coaching relationship. Four distinct coaching phases (worksheets included) walk readers through a course of action they can use with any manager, from the top executive down to the first line manager.
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  • Jossey-Bass 2001
  • For reviews or purchase: Amazon.com


 
Executive Coaching: A Guide for the HR Professional
Anna Marie Valerio and Robert J. Lee
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]A “consumer’s guide" for HR professionals and executives who want to be good clients and savvy consumers of coaching services. Step by step, the book defines what coaching is, who uses it, when, and why. In this comprehensive resource the authors outline the entire coaching process, include key points on the readiness for coaching, and clients’ first-hand accounts of their coaching experiences. Valerio and Lee describe the roles of the HR professional, the client, the boss, and the coach and how all work together in order to achieve a successful coaching engagement.
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  • Pfeiffer, Wiley, 2005
  • For reviews or purchase: Amazon.com


 
Discovering New Horizons: Leadership Coaching for the 21st Century Principal
Teachers21 and ATLAS Communities
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This book focuses on the details to help school principals become more coach-like in their leadership activities. The emphasis is on growth at all stages of the principal's career development and the key role the principal plays in establishing a learning and leadership culture. While the book presents a strong theoretical foundation, it also includes case studies that provide realistic examples of coaching in school settings.
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  • Teachers21, 2007
  • For reviews or purchase: Teachers21


 
Getting Started in Personal and Executive Coaching: How to Create a Thriving Coaching Practice
Stephen G. Fairley and Chris E. Stout
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]This book is for all coaches, seasoned or beginner. Other service providers such as consultants, psychologists, therapists, speakers may also benefit. This book does NOT teach the reader about how to coach; instead the book explains step-by-step in the deepest detail how to ensure a coaching business, the company practice itself, is rock solid. Here's the bad news: beginners make the same mistakes, but the authors list ways to save the pain. Fairley's research on 300 coaches across America shows that starting out as a coach is not pretty: 73 percent of all coaches make less than $10,000 in their first year, with only 60 percent of coaches finding 10 clients in their second year; only ten percent of second-year coaches make $50,000 a year or more; of all coaches, 53 percent make less than $20,000 a year, since only 30 percent of all coaches have 10 or fewer clients; only nine percent of all coaches make $100,000 or more doing coaching. The bottom line message of this book is that to be successful at coaching, coaches must be successful at running a small business. Fortunately, this book provides the how-to with seven tools for making a good first impression and fifteen strategies for landing ten paying clients. Some of the recommendations: identify your specific coaching style - don't try to do them all; select a niche in the market - don't provide services for every area; develop a financial plan; create a business plan that focuses on how you help, who you help, and where your company is going (sample plans are included); engage in networking as a way to find clients; and eliminate the ten marketing mistakes that coaches make. Throughout the book Fairley includes interviews with successful coaches and uses those interviews to provide seven tips or ideas about how to be successful in the coaching business. (Review by Peer Resources Network member, S. Drinnan.)
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Leadership Coaching for the Workplace
Timothy Bentley and Esther Kohn-Bentley
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book_Cover]Coaching has evolved into a distinct profession. And no where is this evolution more noticeable than in the flood of coaching books being published. Virtually anyone with word-processing software and a page layout program can put their work into print. But when a prestigious publisher such as Irwin Publishing combines their quality editorial scrutiny and review with the extensive experience and insights of two practicing coaches, this winning combination results in a highly readable and learning-focused book.

In 219 pages the authors present their idea of coaching as a "deep learning process" requiring not only clearly identified skills and techniques, but also considerable coach self-reflection and self-awareness. While the authors provide a number of chapters detailing step-by-step guidance for improved coaching interactions and concrete applications of coaching in the workplace, their chapters on how coaches can understand themselves with greater precision and clarity and how coaches can become more alert to troubled "coachees" are essential reading for all coaches.

Throughout the book the authors provide real cases and dialogues that demonstrate what happens when coaching goes right and what happens when coaching goes terribly wrong. Experienced coaches will recognize many of the scenarios presented: dealing with difficult managers, coping with technological change, seeking career change, and convincing executives and other senior individuals that they will benefit from coaching.

The authors also provide a series of chapters outlining the various phases on engaging coaches in the workplace. From contracting to assessment to development and integration to completion, Timothy Bentley and Esther Kohn-Bentley detail how leadership coaching can become a practical reality and include a variety of forms and examples that will enrich any coach's tool box.

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Measuring Hidden Dimensions: The Art and Science of Fully Engaging Adults
Otto E. Laske, Interdevelopmental Institute
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Otto Laske is a developmental and organizational psychologist as well as a prolific writer, particularly in mentoring and developmental coaching. In this book, Laske addresses two concerns for the field of coaching; first, the predominant influence by behavorists, and secondly, the absence of a clear theory base and coherent vocabulary. This book is the first of four volumes which together form one complete book. Its main purpose is to present both the theory and practice of developmental process consultation as a form of professional helping. In this volume, Laske examines the social-emotional perspective of mental growth and offers a research-based methodology for developmental interviewing and assessment. In subsequent volumes, Laske focuses on the cognitive and behavioral domains of adult development. All four volumes are necessary to fully grasp Laske's methodology and investigation into human consciousness.

Laske uses psychological constructive-development as the basis for a measurement tool for assessing and communicating clients' meaning making as the source of their behaviours and attitudes. This tool reveals and measures the hidden dimensions-the unconscious meaning making systems-which are the source of clients' issues and counter-productive behaviors. As the title of the book suggests, fully engaging adults is both an art and a science; art as learnable skills interviewing and developmental feedback, and science as qualitative research with specific research questions and methodology.

Primarily addressed to experienced consultants and coaches, this book builds on a number of concepts and theories of adult development, psychology, social science, leadership and organizational development. Practitioners, who are well versed in these fields, will find themselves at home in the works of Edward Schein, Chris Argyris, Robert Kegan, Lisa Laskow Lahey, E. Jaques and Ken Wilbur. Although Laske gives clear explanations of how he uses theory, some previous background in Kegan's orders of consciousness and Lahey's research in object-relations interviews will enable the reader to more readily grasp the intricacy of Laske's method for listening and assessment. His familiarity with these theorists and practitioners is evident. I appreciate Laske's skillfulness in integrating their insights into his own practice and theory; however, I found myself on occasion looking for more specific references to some of the remarks he attributed to them.

Designed as a textbook, it is much more than a textbook for process developmental coaches and consultants. Anyone who accompanies adults in making meaning of their life and work will find this volume extremely helpful for expanding their knowledge of mental growth, assessing their own developmental growth and improving their practice. This volume is comprised of nine chapters; each of which presents theory and concepts along with examples for application, and concludes with questions to increase the reader's understanding of the content. The four appendices offer exercises for reviewing the chapter details and practicing new skills, case studies, as well as methods for using this same developmental tool in teams and larger groups. The tables and figures provide good illustrations for clarifying the theory and concepts. The glossary is provided as a common conceptual framework and vocabulary for the coaching profession. The bibliography is a very helpful resource for those who wish to access his primary sources and do additional research in this field.

This book review would be incomplete without referring to Laske's own disclaimer. While comprehensive in its theoretical basis and practical exercises, this book is not enough for becoming a qualified professional developmental coach. Capable use of this tool surpasses the acquisition of technique and skill. Just as there is no shortcut for achieving mental growth, there is no shortcut for coaches to develop capability and competency. Because the coach is actually the instrument for assessment and communication, coaches have an ethical responsibility to know their own developmental stage in order to listen effectively and determine if and how they should accompany clients in their mental growth. For a neophyte, this measurement tool can be complex and potentially harmful when used inappropriately. Laske cautions readers that they should work closely with a certified trainer in developmental coaching in order to use this tool both capably and competently. I have no doubt this is true. (Review by Peer Resources Network member L.Ste-Marie).

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Therapist as Life Coach: Transforming Your Practice
Patrick Williams and Deborah C. Davis
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]One of the top leaders in the coaching field started not as a coach but as a therapist. Making the transition posed a number of challenges and the authors provide a variety of case stories, exercises and practical information to help other therapists who want to make a similar transition or add coaching to their practice. Because of the focus of this book it has become the most authoritative work on the differences and similarities between coaching and therapy. (View the Table of Contents)
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Coaching Soup for the Cartoon Soul (Numbers 1, 2, and 3)
Germaine Porche and Jed Niederer
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This series offers practical, easy and brief supports to coaches, anywhere. If fact, it is a perfect set of companions for the authors' previous work,Coach Anyone About Anything. Carefully balancing content with cartoon, the authors present readers with short sound-bites of coaching principles stirred in with a generous portion of pen and ink illustrations and comic captions. The end result is a light and airy bouillabaisse of philosophy and wit on several levels.

The three-booklet series is printed as 38-page booklets each measuring 5 inches by 8 inches in pamphlet style with adhesive binding. Notably absent is a table of contents which makes it difficult for readers to return to favorite pages on later readings. This is an interesting omission given the series is heavily loaded with chapter and page references to the parent book of these chowders. Perhaps folding corners for favored pages would soothe some souls.

The ingredients for these 'Soups' provide a nice first course of information for concept-hungry coaches and those they are coaching. Spicy quips give readers tastes of coaching principles grated into one-sentence descriptions. For coaches, these behavioral seasonings encourage them to use games, understand the role of enthusiasm in the relationship or act with sensitivity to the needs of those they are coaching. For those being coached there is a consomme of information about types of coaching styles one may favor such as Business, Entrepreneurial, Parental or Strategic. This allows tasty servings for everyone.

Be aware, these 'Soups' may be an acquired taste with regard to some comic figures. The cartoon characters are largely human forms but do not offer a wide variety of ethnic diversity-an unfortunate aftertaste. Some of the figures also suffer from embittered humor and a penchant for sarcasm. In the end, there are moments when the Soups go cold; but are still suitable for ingestion.

Overall, the three-booklet series is a quick study guide for both coaches and those they coach. Where time is short and humor is needed, readers will find very usable information and great opportunities to build engaged relationships. Despite slightly awkward humor and odd characterizations that are distracting, these 'Soups' satisfy certain hungers. The fare presents particularly good dining when ordered with its optimal main course: Coach Anyone About Anything. (Review by Peer Resources Network member, M. Ciambella)

Ordering Alternatives:
  • Aardvark Global Publishing Company, 2006
  • Amazon.com (for US orders)


 
Law of Attraction: The Science of Attracting More of What You Do Want and Less of What You Don't
Michael J. Losier
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Michael Losier has managed to distill into a spare 100 pages of text a practical explanation of the fundamental laws of quantum mechanics, and a simple three-step process for applying these natural laws in everyday life. With a brief nod to the underlying theory of quantum physics, and with source credit to new-age gurus Esther and Jerry Hicks of Abraham-Hicks Publications, the author proceeds to offer an extremely simple, clear approach to creating the ideal life through deliberate use of the natural Law of Attraction. His step-by-step process for 1) gaining clarity through contrast, 2) creating desire statements and 3) eliminating doubt, are refreshingly practical, easy to understand and easy to follow. Sample worksheets for each step are provided in the book and are downloadable from the accompanying website.

He follows the last process step with 10 tools for "allowing" (the absence of doubt) the desired reality to manifest, such as expressing appreciation and gratitude and creating a void or vacuum for attracting the desired outcome. Readers who are already familiar with this concept will find an excellent review and a simple approach for applying it. Those new to the idea of the Law of Attraction will find a straightforward explanation of how it works and easy-to-follow instructions for applying the principles to practical life situations.

This book is an excellent primer for understanding and applying the principles - a sort of Dick and Jane meet quantum physics. Mentors/Coaches might use it with clients to get to the heart of long-standing issues, and provide an appropriate intervention at a fundamental level. A 40-minute CD can be purchased online with the book. The CD provides an introduction to the concept of the Law of Attraction, a promotion for the book (and Losier's website, seminars and coaching practice) and acts as a shortened audio version of the material in the book. Both the logical organization of the material and Losier's presentation style are extremely effective in creating maximum learning for the listener. (Review by T. Sue Epps of Sparkplug Coaching.)

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Personal and Executive Coaching: The Complete Guide for Mental Health Professionals
Jeffrey E. Auerbach
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]An essential guide for therapists or other mental health practitioners considering the transition to coaching. The author details the differences between coaching and mental health practice and clearly specifies the legal and ethical issues associated with transition, including an admonition about promoting both clinical and coaching work on the same web site. Also included in the book are examples of how various techniques, assessment tools and processes differ in coaching as compared to clinical interventions. The book also provides variety of forms useful in coaching practice and will assist clinical practitioners to determine what type of coaching might fit their own career development goals.
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  • Amazon.com (US and International)
  • Executive College Press, 2001


 
Secrets of an Executive Coach: Proven Methods for Helping Leaders Excel Under Pressure
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The author, a management psychologist, executive coach and former HR executive believes that many executives experience a surfacing of interior conflicts when faced with the crushing demands of today's business world. In this 15 chapter book, he describes six crises (individuation, inferiority, isolation, passion, commitment and self-confidence), illustrated through a number of stories from leaders in crisis. He provides details on how to recognize the symptoms of these interior conflicts, and he argues for confronting, not hiding such crises. He shows how to resolve them using 11 essential coaching techniques which include role playing, self-imitation, metaphor map, and devil's advocate. In essence he believes that crisis management is at the core of effective executive coaching and that there is really no difference between the business and the personal. His goal as a coach is to help executives learn how to become emotionally connected to their work, their organizations and their careers.
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The New Private Practice: Therapist-Coaches Share Stories, Strategies and Advice
Lynn Grodzki (Editor)
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]More and more therapists are adding coaching to their practice or even making a complete change. This book catalogues their stories about engaging in executive coaching, personal coaching, performance coaching and special niche coaching for therapists, college students, lawyers and financial specialists.
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Assess and Improve Your Company
John Seiffer
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]If you could receive coaching from "America's Small Business Coach" that would enable to you to be more successful in your business AND you only had to pay a fee of $12.95(US), would you go for it? John Seiffer, former president of the International Coach Federation (ICF) has made his coaching process available in this self-help booklet. It's the first in a series that has the title: "The Simple Truth Series." In the booklet Coach Seiffer identifies four simple "truths" that can help business owners and even those interested in their own career progress move more quickly towards the realization of their goals.

This 49-page booklet is like having a conversation with an experienced coach who knows the issues you face and is prepared to help you deepen your understanding and strengthen your action planning. A series of interactive prompts, including self-scoring assessments, sentence completion tasks, and summary statements all enrich the coaching experience. (More)

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Be Your Own Coach: Your Pathway to Possibility
Barbara Braham and Chris Wahl
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book provides concepts and exercises used by successful, professional coaches and enables readers to gain the most from coaching without hiring a coach! Although focused on self-coaching, the authors also support the value of an external coach and they believe the book will help readers pinpoint what they want from a coach and how to make the best use of engaging a coach. The authors recommend that readers can form study groups in the workplace, for example, and put into practice the many tips and ideas, thus enabling a low-cost way of implementing coaching. Readers will learn how to identify coachable moments, achieve their potential, and use seven tools to achieve breakthroughs. As with all Crisp publications, this book is clearly written, highly practical, and well-organized. If you are new to the coaching field or want to provide clients with a way to zero in on key coaching principles to improve their work, relationships or leadership, this book is the ticket.
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The Business of Coaching: A Comprehensive Guide to Starting and Growing Your Coaching Practice (book and workbook)
Dorcas Kelley
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]For those personal or business coaches who have never owned and run their own business, it's easy to feel overwhelmed and ignore or skip over critical business activities necessary to build a solid, relevant and profitable coaching practice. Even experienced coaches may find themselves wondering, "Am I doing everything I need to do to grow my practice?" Both of these works provide the personal and business coach with basic business start-up information. The book and companion workbook are divided into four sections which are further organized into fourteen chapters. In the first section Coach Kelley covers business foundation topics such as naming your business, deciding on a legal structure, and attending to legal regulations. In the next section financial matters such as money management, insurance, taxes and even planning for retirement are covered. Section Three attends to marketing and communication, while Section Four covers topics associated with day-to-day management as well as a topic that impacts many coaches: making the transition to self-employment. (More...)
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New Directions for Therapists: Building a Successful Coaching Business (Audio Tapes)
Interviewer: Patrick Williams
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Fourteen therapists in various stages of making the transition to coaching reveal their attraction to coaching, what inspired them to become involved in coaching, the differences they perceive between coaching and therapy and how they currently practice coaching or combine coaching with therapy. A bonus interview is included with the head of one of the leading coaching schools who has significant grounding in both therapy and coaching. An excellent resource for any therapist considering coaching or for therapists wondering how to expand their current client list. The set includes six tapes, and although all the therapists are asked similar questions, their answers vary widely and the interviewer makes the most helping them deepen their responses. (More)
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Intentional Change: Personal and Professional Coaches Describe Their Work and Lives
John S. Stephenson, Editor
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book includes a number of chapters written by experienced coaches who specialize in working with different populations. Each coach provides details on their background, how they became attracted to coaching and how they assist their clients. Some of the coaching areas covered are coaching family businesses, coaching persons with attention deficit disorder, and coaching from a spiritual perspective. One of the unique chapters in this book emphasizes the role of ethics in coaching practice and the author provides ethical guidance for coaches under four topic headings: competence, autonomy, confidentiality, and conflict of interest. New and experienced coaches will find valuable ideas in this book and even persons considering the field will be able to benefit from the various perspectives shared by the experts.
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Coach Yourself to Success: 101 Tips for Reaching Your Goals at Work and In Life
Talane Miedaner
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The author focuses on proven strategies for attracting success. Her practical wisdom is drawn from her experiences as a professional coach for Fortune 500 clients and her own experience as a corporate banker. Her coaching tips are revealed in an easy-to-follow, ten-part program. This is not a book of platitudes and cliches, it is the kind of book that provides realistic and useable information for personal, business, and career growth.
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Coaching and Mentoring for Dummies
Marty Brounstein
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Despite the demeaning title, this book has a number of valuable tips and lists to help managers improve their coaching and mentoring activities. For example, watch out for the following pitfalls associated with mentoring: telling proteges how to do their jobs; giving solutions without soliciting input; making decisions for your protege; giving frequent advice; taking over situations; and criticizing for mistakes. The book provides a section on how to use questions, not commands to improve performance and grow the talent that is in employees. There are also tips on how to use coaching and mentoring to deal with diversity, motivation, and other contemporary challenges.
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Coaching and Mentoring: Practical Methods to Improve Learning
Eric Parsloe and Monika Wray
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The authors believe traditional learning must be abandoned in favor of the more effective use of coaching and mentoring. They emphasize the Seven Golden Rules of Simplicity and provide practical examples of matching staff, ways to give feedback, how to ask the right questions and other useful ideas for successful coaching and mentoring activities.
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Extreme Success: The 7-Part Program That Shows You How to Succeed Without Struggle
Rich Fettke
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Rich Fettke is not just a professional coach and elected member of the International Coach Federation Executive. He's also an extreme athlete, rock climber, bungee jumper and of course author. This combination makes for an energetic book that prods readers to dare and do in pursuit of their goals and dreams. In his role as coach/author Fettke asks us to take clear, immediate and sometimes challenging steps, while encouraging and supporting our efforts. His tactics for such success factors as overcoming fear and maintaining momentum are brought to life with stories from Fettke's world of coaching, sports and family. As long as readers refrain from comparing themselves to the ultra-energetic author, they will enjoy and learn from Fettke's real-life examples. To help his readers stay motivated and on track without the benefit of a professional coach, Fettke advocates the use of "Success Partners", who act as peer mentors. At the same time, he counsels readers on how to be effective Success Partners themselves, reinforcing the mentoring best practices of listening, encouraging and supporting. (Review by Peer Resources Network.)
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  • Simon and Shuster (Fireside) 2002
  • For reviews or purchase: Amazon.com
  • Purchase directly from the publisher in either hardcover, paperback, audio cassette, or audio CD at SimonSays.com
  • BestBookBuys.com


 
Winning in the Game of Life: Self-Coaching Secrets for Success
Tom Gegax
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]A great story about how an everyday person who experienced marital setbacks, cancer, and a troubled business found his way to engage in self-coaching that changed his life and business. Caught up in focusing outward (studying intellectual concepts, keeping physically fit, and being a good manager), the author describes his transition from a person who thought the source of his troubles was outside of himself to becoming a person who started to examine his own spirit and soul. In a paradoxical way, the author shares his strategies (Seven Take-Action Steps) and helps readers coach themselves to a fuller life.
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The Working Life: The Promise And Betrayal Of Modern Work
Joanne Ciulla
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book, written by a business professor from the University of Richmond especially for Peer Resources, is not exactly a book on coaching. Instead it emphasizes what coaches already know: that for most people in work settings there is a gap between our experienced reality and what we would like work to be. The book does not provide answers but is meant to stimulate dialogue about the meaning of work and the role it plays in our lives. Essential reading for coaches working with executives and managers as well as line workers.
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Coaching: Evoking Excellence in Others
James Flaherty
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Flaherty suggests that three products of coaching are: a) long term excellence (the client meets the high objective standards of the discipline in which coaching is occuring; b) self-correction (well coached clients can observe when they are performing well and when they are not and will make any necessary adjustments independently of the coach and thus coaches avoid the temptation of becoming indispensable and, instead, work to build the competence of their client; and c) self-generation (well coached people know they can always improve and continually find ways on their own to do so—they learn in ways that improves their competence).
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Inspirational Leadership: Destiny, Calling and Cause
Lance Secretan
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The key word to succeeding in leadership is inspiration, not motivation, says best-selling Canadian business author, Lance Secretan. Inspirational leadership is based on service not persuasion. The author describes a seven-step process for inspirational leadership which includes coaching others to higher levels of personal and professional fulfillment. This is a book which significantly contributes to valuing the role of spirituality at work.

The photo to the left is neither the book cover nor Lance Secretan, but another spiritually oriented person: Grey Owl.

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Making Your Dreams Come True: Find Your Passion with America's Dream Coach
Marcia Wieder
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The author offers a step-by-step process for making your dreams come true. She presents a coaching sequence: gain clarity about what your dream is; remove the obstacles, especially the limiting beliefs; and design simple steps to make your dreams happen. She then offers practical ideas for achieving personal and professional goals by overcoming self-imposed limits. Examples are drawn from her work with a variety of people, and the book concludes with a workbook to put your learning into practice. Marcia is the founder of Dream University and the author of two books, Life Is But a Dream and Doing Less and Having More and has appeared on national television.
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A Spiritual Audit of Corporate America: A Hard Look at Spirituality, Religion, and Values in the Workplace
Ian Mitroff and Elizabeth Denton
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The authors are the first to attempt a rigorous study of the impact of spirituality at work. They describe five typical models of businesses driven by more than profit alone and survey employees to uncover their opinions on spirit at work. The major conclusion: people want a holistic workplace where they can participate body and soul.
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Coaching with Spirit: Allowing Success to Emerge
Teri-E Belf
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book helps readers increase their awareness and personal responsibility using a process that defines both spiritual growth and self-discovery through coaching. The author believes that coaching with Spirit leads to better service for clients by helping them obtain desired results and increase well-being. She suggests helpful methods for integrating Spirit into coaching practices, presenting reflections and applications for both beginning and seasoned coaches. The book includes a variety of exercises, activities, points for reflection, assessments, tools, and techniques for learning to coach with Spirit.
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Awakening Corporate Soul: Four Paths to Unleash the Power of People at Work
Eric Klein and John Izzo
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The authors (a yogi and a minister both of whom are business consultants) advocate the use of ancient concepts to improve both employee satisfaction and workplace yield. They mix Eastern and Western ideas to suggest new ways of developing more motivated and committed workforce. The four paths they detail in the book include creativity, productivity, innovation, and inspiration. Each path stimulates different facets of a company's soul. The authors reveal how leaders can help those around them attain fulfillment while simultaneously positioning their firms for increased success.
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The Passion Plan: A Step-By-Step Guide to Discovering, Developing, and Living Your Passion
Richard Y. Chang
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The author, who is a leading consultant on performance for organizations and individuals, shows readers how to discover their own passion, decide where they want it to take them, and develop a plan to get there. Readers use passion to improve their performance, persuade others to help them meet their goals, and persist in the face of obstacles. Through clear explanations, insightful self-assessments, and inspiring stories of people, Chang unlocks the hidden power of passion and shows how to use it to create the life you want.
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Make Your Life a Masterpiece
Peter Legge
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]I have read many such books over the years and Peter Legge's book is right up there as one of the best. Packed with personal anecdotes and anecdotes from others, including some of his employees who often share informal and formal mentoring experiences, this is an easy read, clearly written by someone with a wealth of successful life experiences who is willing to share some of his secrets with others.

The book contains 30 life-changing techniques to help readers reach their potential, techniques which have been used in the success of Canada Wide Magazines of which Peter Legge is President and CEO, techniques which mentors and coaches could use when relating to their mentees or people they are moving alongside in some way. What makes it different from a lot of other similar books is that there is more emphasis on living a balanced life and considerably less on making millions of dollars. Chapters like 'Making Every Moment Count', 'Keep Things Simple', 'Take Time to Build Your Relationshops With Others, 'Staying Fit', 'Choose to Be a Life-Long Optimist', 'Develop a Pleasing Personality' and ' Creating Balance in Your Life' are examples of some of the 30 techniques that will motivate and inspire anyone looking for some general ideas on how to reach their potential, in addition to the more traditional chapters about seizing the moment, goal setting, being self-disciplined, working hard etc.

Peter shares heaps of useful tips at the end of many of the chapters, key points to reflect on which he calls 'A Master Knows' and there are also helpful and motivational quotes, some well-known, some of which I had not read before. This is a great book for mentors, coaches, someone starting off on a career, as well as for someone well into their career and wanting to reflect on how life is panning out for them at that particular moment - 31 useful checkpoints. It is also a book that one can turn to for some reminders when the need is there, thanks to the user-friendly style and layout. Highly recommended! (Review by Peer Resources Network member R. Cox.)

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The Path of Least Resistance: Learning to Become the Creative Force in Your Own Life
Robert Fritz
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]A revolutionary program for creating anything, from a functional kitchen to a computer program, to a work of art, Robert Fritz demonstrates that any of us has the innate power to create. Discover the steps of creating; the importance of creating what you truly love, how to focus on the creative process to move from where you are to where you want to be, and much more.
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Coaching in the Library: A Management Strategy for Achieving Excellence
Ruth F. Metz
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Silence may be what most of us think of when it comes to libraries, but this book shows quite dramatically that even librarians are tuned into making their work and their workplace more effective and meaningful. The author uses scenarios, events and personnel management issues drawn from library experience, but the ideas apply to virtually any setting. Some of the situations described include dealing with a coworker, giving feedback about poor performance, and coaching a team. Each chapter details the circumstances or context and is followed by what, why, and how sections. The author emphasizes the role that coaching plays in library rejuvenation and transformation and both the examples and concepts can apply to virtually any type of library or organization.
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The Adversity Quotient: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities
Paul Stoltz
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]People typically have a consistent way of dealing with obstacles: quitting, camping at a level just under success, or climbing. Stoltz proposes the acronym, CORE, to summarize the qualities associated with the adversity quotient. Control over adverse events, Ownership or origin: the degree to which a person can accept the consequences of adversity, Reach: the degree to which a person allows adversity to infiltrate life, and endurance: the degree to which adversity is allowed to dominate all perspectives. The book also provides information as to how to improve AQ, such as keeping alert for adversity and recognizing its existence and developing a series of stoppers, brief exercises the limit adversity from being turned into catastrophe. This book has considerable value for coaches who are looking for ways to help clients deal with adversity.
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The Handbook of Coaching: A Resource Guide to Effective Coaching with Individuals and Organizations
Frederic M. Hudson
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]A workbook for coaches, aspiring coaches, human resource managers, and visionary executives, this timely book offers a complete overview of the fast-growing field that transforms organizations and empowers new leaders. It presents an essential compendium of the basic information, concisely describing the major theories, skills, and techniques of coaching.
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Four Steps To Building A Profitable Coaching Practice: A Complete Marketing Resource Guide For Coaches
Deborah Brown-Volkman
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book is designed for beginning coaches. The author's intent is to help coaches spend less time in learning how to market their program so that they can spend more time in growing the practice. The material is presented in four steps for building a practice. Ms. Brown-Volkman also includes a section on the importance of marketing (presented in the form of quotes from other coaches) and a section providing foundational tips for becoming a profitable coach (e.g., receive proper training; have clear goals; know your market).

Step 1 assists the reader in deciding "who you want to coach." Step 2 helps the coach "create a program your target audience will pay you for." In Step 3, readers create a marketing strategy, and step four teaches coaches how to sell their program.

This book is best viewed as a working manual. The author weaves practical, hands-on assignments throughout the text. The reader is coached through tasks such as creating a web-sites, e-newsletters, e-books, and e-courses.

To derive the most benefit from this book, the reader should be willing to invest the time involved for working through the steps. The author is realistic in time constraints and points out that some steps could require as long as 360 days to complete. However, by the time the steps are completed, the reader will have a thorough, marketable program and will have already taken major steps to promote the practice.

One of the strengths of the text is that it provides eight pages of online resources. These resources provide material the reader needs to begin actively promoting the practice. For example, resources are provided for marketing, promoting articles and e-newsletters, and for speaking and practice promotion.

This is a handy book to keep on your shelf. It will serve as a good reference as you complete each of the steps for building your practice. This is not a book to read once and then file away. Instead, it will best serve its purpose if you keep it near your desktop for easy reference as you actively work at building your practice. If you invest the time in completing the exercises, you will finish the book with a clear goal of what you want from your practice and with active tools you can use to promote the practice. (Review by Peer Resources Network member, Dr. Rhonda Berry - Members receive books at no cost in exchange for preparing a review.)

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First Things First: To Live, to Love, to Learn, to Leave a Legacy
Stephen R. Covey, A Roger Merrill, and Rebecca Merrill
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Written by the creator of The Seven Habits, First Things First shines a brilliant light into the semi-darkness of time management techniques. Instead of seeing fragments of our lives, we can now see the whole picture. While not exactly a coaching book, the application of the principles developed in this book help people make significant life changes.
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How to Want What You Have: Discovering the Magic and Grandeur of Ordinary Existence
Timothy Ray Miller
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]It is human nature to believe that if we had just a little more, or that slightly better something, our lives would be perfect. This practical book convinces readers first that wanting what you already have is the surest way to happiness, and goes on to offer simple and credible methods for achieving this elusive state of mind.
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I Could Do Anything If I Only Knew What It Was: How to Discover What You Really Want and How to Get It
Barbara Sher and Barbara Smith
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Based on the principle that love is what we do best, the bestselling author of Wishcraft: How to Get What You Really Want offers expert, reassuring, concrete advice on getting to the heart of what we really want in life and dissolving the inner blocks that prevent us from achieving it.
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To Build the Life You Want, Create the Work You Love: The Spiritual Dimension of Entrepreneuring
Marsha Sinetar
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The best-selling author of Do What You Love, The Money Will Follow, explores the inner qualities of effective entrepreneurs who take control of their working lives and achieve inner fulfillment and financial stability by creating their work. Writing doesn't come any better than this.
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Soar With Your Strengths
Donald O. Clifton and Paula Nelson
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]A groundbreaking, inspiring book for businesses, managers, and individuals on how to achieve the absolute best by focusing on strengths and steering away from weaknesses, this revolutionary, humanistic approach to business will transform companies, build careers, and change lives. It already has for many of the companies described in the book such as Federal Express, Prudential, and Pepsico.
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Be Your Own Executive Coach: Master High Impact Communications
Peter Delisser
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Because executives have to deal with many different situations requiring considerable skill and complex attitudes, Peter deLisser provides the tools and shows readers how to use them. He is a former college football coach who knows how to deal with tyrannical bosses. But he also knows how to motivate since he was on the sidelines for many years. An additional twist comes into play in that the author was also a stand-up comedian.
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Action Coaching: How to Leverage Individual Performance for Company Success
David L. Dotlich and Peter C. Cairo
What's Troubling About This Work?
[Book Cover]A large number of new books purport to be about coaching. This book instead is about analyzing and managing disquised as coaching. The authors make a strong case as to how important it is to diagnose various types of employees and then create a coaching strategy for that type in order to reduce the possible interference that type might have for achieving corporate goals. The kind of coaching described by these authors fits well into a corporate culture that abdicates effective supervision or abandons managing responsibly.
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Stop Managing, Start Coaching! How Performance Coaching Can Enhance Commitment and Improve Productivity
Jerry W. Gilley and Nathaniel W. Boughton
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Highlights the critical skill of performance coaching, demonstrating how managers can balance the roles of trainer, mentor, career coach, and confronter to improve productivity in the workplace. This guide shows how to develop a practical and cost-effective human resource strategy and evaluate its effects on performance improvement, reinforce positive work traits through reward strategies, and master and practice the art of employee self-esteeming: the next step beyond employee empowerment.
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The Solo Professional: Navigating the Business Side of Your Business (E-Book)
Valerie Barone Taloni and Karen Childress (Editors)
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Suppose you could get concrete, down-to-earth advice from 39 of the most experienced experts in starting a business and you only had to pay less than a dollar per expert? The editors of this e-book have put together an array of expertise that can assist anyone, not just coaches, in getting their business on the right track. Each expert succinctly describes the challenges awaiting the solo professional, shares their experiences or wrong turns and provides specific ideas, leads and useful resources. Every topic is included from developing your vision, to pricing your services, to marketing, to accounting, to deciding on legal structures, to planning for retirement, to building a support system, to establishing an office practice and more. The editors (who are also authors of some of the articles) have assembled a prestigious team of contributors and have even created a chapter that focuses on "if I knew then what I know now" where the experts list both their best business decision as well as the decision that caused them the most grief.
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  • The authors of this e-book have made it available at no cost to members of the Peer Resources Network. To download a free copy, go to the Members Only Section. (This is a PDF e-book.)


 
Chop Wood, Carry Water: A Guide to Finding Spiritual Fulfillment in Everyday Life
Rick Fields, Peggy Taylor, and Rex Weyler
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Over 140,000 copies sold. An authoritative resource tool and essential companion on any spiritual journey. Practical and inspirational. A must for anyone who wants to integrate the wisdom of spiritual tradition into daily living.
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Mind Over Water: Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing
Craig Lambert
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Don't be misled by the title of this book. Sure, you can learn about rowing, but the more important aspect is the way the author uses rowing as a metaphor for life-life that includes balance, enjoyment, creativity, and meeting challenges. Coaches will benefit from the examples and might consider recommending the book as supportive reading for clients.
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Masterful Coaching: Extraordinary Results by Impacting People and the Way They Think and Work Together
Robert Hargrove
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Written as an interactive dialogue with the reader, Masterful Coaching emphasizes core coaching skills: sponsoring, counselling, acknowledging, teaching and confronting. Provides examples of coaching for breakthrough results from leading companies.
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Masterful Coaching Fieldbook: Grow Your Business, Multiply Your Profits, Win the Talent War!
Robert Hargrove
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This workbook is a companion to his 1995 Masterful Coaching book (see previous entry above) and emphasizes how to put the theories into practice. Sections detail the development of coaching mindset, a five-step coaching model, and a series of interviews that explore the use of coaching in the achievement of various objectives. A neat addition is the abundance of interactive exercises and activities.
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Co-Active Coaching: New Skills for Coaching People Toward Success in Work and Life
Laura Whitworth, Henry Kimsey-House and Phil Sandahl
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The authors, all professional coaches, believe that the client and the coach should be active collaborators and that the agenda should be generated by the client. The strength of their conviction is apparent throughout the book and helps to convey a solid and consistent philosophy.

The book is divided into four parts. The first section describes the co-active coaching model and details the coach’s contributions in the coaching relationship.

The second section, Co-Active Coaching Skills, describes the five contexts of coaching: listening, intuition, curiosity, action/learning and self-management. These contexts of coaching are described thoroughly with sample coaching dialogue to illustrate their main points. Each of these contexts of coaching has an entire chapter devoted to it and will provide many ideas for both new and experienced coaches. Each chapter provides an opportunity for the reader to review his or her own practice and ask the questions: "What am I doing well?" and "Where is there room for improvement?"

The third section of the book discusses Co-Active Coaching Practices, focusing on the client’s fulfillment, balance and process. This section discusses the coach’s role in addressing the needs of the client. For example, the authors point out that most clients come to coaching for fulfillment. And then most of them, right away, begin to cheat on themselves by asking for less, lowering their standards, or holding back. The coach’s role is then to challenge the client to hold themselves accountable and to "pursue their own fulfillment." In this section the authors concentrate on how coaches can develop practices to help clients meet their own needs.

The Coach’s Toolkit provides the reader with tools that can be immediately applied to one’s practice as well as a comprehensive list of powerful questions and inquiries to use with the client. Many of these tools and questions will be familiar to the experienced coach, but most coaches will find that there is a question that is worded slightly differently; or that there are one or two approaches that will allow a slightly different and perhaps more effective path with a client.

This is a book that coaches will find worth having on their bookshelf as a reference and as a place to go to find ideas if they are struggling with an issue with a client. Review by Peer Resources Network member and coach Bonnie Turner.

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Developing High Performance People: The Art of Coaching
Oscar G. Mink, Barbara P. Mink, and Keith Owen
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book features the details of how to develop empowering relationships and understanding how people learn and grow. Coaching as renewal is a key element and the author provides assistance on how to deal with failure as well as how to coach in unique situations.
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Coaching for Commitment: Interpersonal Strategies for Obtaining Superior Performance from Individuals and Teams (2nd Edition)
Dennis Kinlaw
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This second edition provides new material on team coaching and guidelines to improve coaching abilities. Case studies and checklists are provided and the book is one of an integrated series that includes a trainer's guide, participant workbooks, a coaching skills inventory and a problem-solving skills questionnaire.
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The Business Coach: A Game Plan for the New Work Environment
James S. Doyle
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]The focus in this book is on how to establish a successful coaching relationship with any employee and within any organization. It includes tips, techniques, and a step-by-step guide to growth and mastery. The coaching relationship requires a shift in thinking and behavior and it not just a formula; it requires an internal transformation on the part of the coach.
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If It Wasn't for the People This Job Would Be Fun!: Coaching for Buy-In & Results
C.B. Motsett
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book shows readers how to gain the cooperation of employees and co-workers using fivesimple steps. "If It Wasn't for the People" provides executives, managers, and supervisors with the techniques needed to ensure that employees willingly and consistently perform to higher levels of expectation. Readers will find a process that gets results and effectively transfers the responsibility for an employee's actions or inactions where it belongs-- on that person's shoulders.
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Personal Coaching for Results: How to Mentor and Inspire Others to Amazing Growth
Lou Tice
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Tice has been in the business of teaching people how to succeed for many years. In this book, this member of the Trainers Hall of Fame, gives readers the inside information they need to mentor and inspire those around them.
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Coaching Across Cultures: New Tools for Leveraging National, Corporate and Professional Differences
Philippe Rosinski
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Written in an easy-to-understand manner, this book can help coaches compete in the global marketplace and assist others involved with other international business development professions. The author cites many real-life examples based on his coaching experience with global organizations such as IBM, Unilever, and Chubb Insurance. Rosinski has developed a "Cultural Orientations Framework" (COF) which he believes is the heart of coaching and mentoring. The COF is divided into seven categories and each category exemplifies the importance of understanding the peoples of the world for successful implementation of projects globally. The author helps you understand your own national or corporate culture and how to recognize and benefit from cultural differences.

One of the categories, for example, "leveraging senses of power and responsibility," describes the role of control, harmony and humility in diverse cultures and highlights the potential for Westerners (specifically Americans) to often have a unipolar thought process. Such an approach can limit success when working with international clients. In my own work as Director of Systems Engineering for a large telecommunications company, Harris Corporation, I observed this limiting effect directly. I had a staff of engineers and technicians as direct reports, and one individual, who was a bright and aspiring American engineer, had the dimension of being a universalist, corresponding to the author's characterization of Americans. As we were awarded more and more international projects, I could see that this "universalist" approach would not work in many other cultures, specifically in Arabic and Malaysian cultures. During the system design for proposals, I began to show him a "particularist" dimension which "emphasized particular circumstances", as detailed by Rosinski. As part of the system design, the potential customer's culture was brought into the design process. This coaching resulted in several contract awards globally and the engineer being promoted to principal engineer at a relatively young age. The application of one of the author's concepts resulted in success for all concerned.

The author's definition of the Global Scorecard as "a tool designed to facilitate the goal-setting process" is very germane to the process of international business development. This process requires a thorough meld of the individual and the organization's setting of goals for development, maintenance and future expansion in the global marketplace. In the book's final chapter, "Bringing Discipline, Cultures and People Together," the reader is lifted to a higher purpose. Rosinski hopes that cultural understanding will assist not only coaches but also lead to successful implementation of projects worldwide for those involved in the international business development process. Rosinski's hope is that the techniques described in his book will "promote the conditions of human peace and unity".

This book will increase confidence in attaining higher goals in international business development. Anyone interested in developing a "bridge" between the various cultures (societies), independent of the specific industry or discipline or within departments in the corporate arena and even between people of various professions, for example, engineers or software designers trying to work collaboratively in teams with marketing or sales folks, will find this work invaluable. (Review by Joseph Cool)

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The Do's & Don'ts of Work Team Coaching: A Comprehensive Study of the Worker/Coach Interpersonal Relationship
Randy Glasbergen and Steve Herbelin
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book examines work team coaching from the point of view of the workers, who address forty-five essential dos and don'ts. Their frank views are reinforced with vivid and memorable anecdotes from the workplace. The Dos and Don'ts of Work Team Coaching is intended to make the facilitator's job easier and enhance his or her ability to lead effectively.
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Take Yourself to the Top: The Secrets of America's No.1 Career Coach
Laura Berman Fortgang
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This book truely helps the reader decide what he or she really wants in life. The author, an experienced career coach, helps the reader create practical solutions and gain the desire to put those solutions into practice. This book is particularily valuable for people who feel stuck, want to burst through barriers, and uncover their strengths and talents. Eleven potential obstacles to career success are defined and examined and plans to transcend each are summarized. The author provides a number of anecdotes from real clients who have taken themselves to the top.
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Creating Your Future: Five Steps to the Life of Your Dreams
David B. Ellis
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Best-selling author Dave Ellis offers readers a motivational road map for getting the most out of their life and making their dreams come true. This five-step program--Commit, Create, Construct, Carry out and Celebrate--invites readers to take charge of their future by setting goals and achieving them. Learning to live a more meaningful and deeply fulfilling life is within your reach using Ellis’ inspirational guide. The book includes many strategies and a large number of exercises that lead to greater self-knowledge.
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Falling Awake: Creating the Life of Your Dreams
David B. Ellis
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]In this well-crafted, absorbing, interactive book Dave Ellis invites the reader to explore twelve success strategies to living the life of your dreams. This book is like having a coach in a book. Ellis does not tell the reader what to do, but rather supports and challenges the reader through in-depth exercises, journal outlines, and new ways of looking at life. He is there to guide readers to create their own life plan. His conversational writing style is easy to read and invites reflection and introspection. This book is not for everyone, but if you are prepared to take the time, make a commitment and do some deep self-examination, I highly recommend it. Check out the interactive website at www.FallingAwake.com to go even deeper into this journey. There are on-line journals, more personal growth tools, and lots of interesting places to explore. (Review by Barbara Swanston, A Coach for Life and member of the Peer Resources Network.)
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Soul Work: Finding the Work You Love, Loving the Work You Have
Deborah P. Bloch and Lee J. Richmond
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Work life provides an opportunity for social interaction, income, and gaining competence and personal satisfaction. Connecting your work to spiritual values ensures that work will also bring meaning and depth into your life life. Coaches often have to assist clients to find that balance, and many clients have jobs that on the surface contribute to a dispirited life. Soul Work can not only assist clients to seek out life-enhancing work, but also create such a workplace within their current employment.
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Take Time for Your Life: A Personal Coach's Seven Step Program for Creating the Life You Want
Cheryl Richardson
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Too many people feel stressed, unfulfilled, and overworked and need to find a way to break out of this recurring experience. The seven steps recommended by author Cheryl Richardson, one of the founders of the International Coach Federation, start with placing your own care in top priority. She helps the reader to define priorities and determine what actions, issues, and people are sapping your energy. Each step in the seven-step process is directed towards gaining spiritual, emotional, and financial prosperity.
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The Heart Aroused: Poetry and the Preservation of the Soul in Corporate America
David Whyte
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Is there a place for emotional and spiritual life in the workplace? Yes, if you want creativity and authentic production, according to poet David Whyte. For coaches who yearn to help their clients find balance and support their spiritual and emotional life, this book can act as both an inspiration and guide.
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The Heart of Coaching: Using Transformational Coaching to Create a High-Performance Culture
Thomas G. Crane
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]Coaching is not limited to a person called a coach. It must be integrated throughout the organization. This book provides a road map for transforming executives and managers into coaches with emotional intelligence. The author guarantees that organizations with coaching skills and a feedback-rich environment will outperform their competitors.
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  Coaching for Results (CD-ROM, Workbook, Certificate, Quick Install Card)
McGraw Hill Lifetime Learning Essential Business Skills Series
What's Hot About This Work?
[MH Logo]Managers learn to analyze their own attitudes and behavior; master four steps of succcessful coaching (establishing ground rules, diagnosing problems and issues, planning activities to improve performance, and providing feedback).
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Coaching a Winning Team (Video)
What's Hot About This Work?
[Book Cover]This video is a talk by Tara VenDerveer, Director and Head Coach, Women's Basketball, Stanford University, which is highly inspirational and applies to business settings where team work is essential. One of the most winning coaches in basketball, Coach VenDerveer, uses stories to depict how to build credibility and consensus in a vision, how to use enthusiasm to turn around team motivation, and how to identify and use complementary strengths in a team.
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  • Kantola Productions, 1997 (55 minutes)
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If you are interested in peer coaching (primarily associated with teaching and education), here are some excellent books and tapes:


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